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10 results for The State Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980
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Record #:
9293
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Colonel William Holland Thomas represented the Cherokee Indians and was a state senator. In 1862, he led 200 Cherokees of the 69th Regiment which was used primarily to protect the western part of the state during the Civil War. Although Thomas was court-martialed for failure to follow orders in 1864, he was not removed from his post, and he surrendered to Federal forces on May 7, 1865.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p9-10, por
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Record #:
9296
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This year marked the 82nd Anniversary of the North Carolina Society of New York who honored the North Carolina School of the Arts at its annual celebration. Established in 1965, the school provides professional training for talented young people looking to pursue careers in the performing arts. The NCSA also tours, culturally enriching the region through performances, usually at no cost to audiences.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
9294
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Incorporated in 1705, Bath is the oldest village in North Carolina. Because the town is much as it was in the 19th-century, the State Historic Bath Commission and the State Department of Archives and History have worked to make Bath an historic showplace. Many old buildings have been restored and a visitors center has been erected. \r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p10-11, il
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Record #:
9295
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Jessie Mace learned to dowse for water when he was thirty-five. Now seventy-nine, Mace continues to make his living by finding water for people. Often called in after people have spent thousands of dollars drilling, Mace sites wells for people and is somewhat of a troubleshooter. He says a cherry twig is best when dowsing.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p12-13, il
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Record #:
9297
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Daintry Allison became a schoolteacher in Beech Log, North Carolina in 1914. This article is an account of her eventful first year based on a taped interview the author conducted with her in Fairview on July 24, 1975.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p16-18, 37, il
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Record #:
9301
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On December 18, 1891, Carolina Shipp was hanged near Dallas in Gaston County. She was the last woman executed on the gallows in North Carolina. Her death was unpleasant and grave robbers exhumed her body the night it was buried. Shipp was accused of killing her baby, but maintained that her boyfriend, Mack Farrar, was the guilty one.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p25-26, il
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Record #:
9300
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Leap Year was once very important to bachelors in Britain. Beginning with St. Patrick and St. Bridget, an unwritten law formed saying that during the leap year, any man who was proposed to by a woman and refused her had to buy her a silk dress. Later, women were required to wear scarlet petticoats to indicate they were taking advantage of the law, and men were excommunicated if they refused a proposal.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p22, il
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Record #:
9299
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The Klonteska Inn was built by Dr. Robert Douglas Jennings in 1895. Located in Banner Elk, the inn was run by the Jennings who cooked for their guests and Beech Mountain offered a plethora of recreation activities for them. The inn operated until 1928 and was torn down in the early 50s.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p20-21, il, por
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Record #:
9302
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The umbrella, owned by monarchs and kings in the 12th century B.C., was the first symbol of status. Made of leather and expensive, umbrellas disappeared until the 17th century when it was made with lighter cloth. It was used first by writers and university professors in New England and by doctors in the South.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p27-28
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Record #:
9298
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Guilford College Fire Chief Bob Wilson has developed a system to get water from privately owned lakes and ponds to fires more quickly. Now, with hydrants set up at all private lakes and ponds, pumper trucks connect to the hydrant, fill their tanker, and go to the nearby fires.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p19, por
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