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6 results for The State Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980
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Record #:
8944
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Abstract:
Named for an Indian tribe, Lake Waccamaw in Columbus County hosts summer speed boat races and annual sail boat regattas. Many legends exist concerning the lake including one that it was once a giant flower garden protected by an Indian princess. The Great Spirit answered her prayers and turned the garden into the lake, protecting her from her enemies. The lake is home to several kinds of fish including largemouth bass and crappies.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p8-11, il
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Record #:
8945
Abstract:
Lillian Steichen Sandburg was married to Pulitzer prize-winner Carl Sandburg. She and her husband moved into a home near Hendersonville in 1945 where he wrote and she bred goats. After Sandburg's death, the farm was made into a national historic site in 1968 and is free and open to the public. Thirteen of Mrs. Sandburg's goat herd still remain on the farm.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p12-14, il, por
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Record #:
8946
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Abstract:
The morel is the first mushroom that grows in the spring. From a distance, they look like pine cones and grow most abundantly in Michigan, Ohio, and Kentucky. There is still no effective way to guarantee morels will grow in the same place year and after year, and therefore commercially growing the mushrooms has proven impossible. They can be found in apple orchards and woods, and the best time to search for them is after a warm spring rain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p16-18, 65, il
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Record #:
8949
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Abstract:
Administered by the Travel and Tourism Division of the State Department of Commerce in Raleigh, North Carolina currently has five Welcome Centers on its borders. Called information specialists, the women who work at the centers dispense information regarding tourist sites and distances to various attractions. They estimate about half of the out-of-state visitors are visiting North Carolina for the first time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p23-24, il
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Record #:
8948
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Abstract:
Both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of South Carolina at Columbia shorten their names to Carolina. By examining school records and name changes, the author comes to the conclusion that UNC-Chapel Hill first called itself Carolina, although USC-Columbia will continue to be known by the same name in its state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p22-23, 53, il
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Record #:
8947
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Abstract:
Carolyn Trail of Norwood orders wheat for weaving from Minnesota where it is organically grown and cut by hand. She makes baskets, wall hangings, and house blessings. Trail enjoys teaching her craft to local Girl Scouts as well as other townspeople. She hopes to soon work with a grower closer to home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p20-21, il
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