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8 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978
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Record #:
8969
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Abstract:
Lord Cornwallis and his British army had been in Charlotte for almost a week when Cornwallis dispatched a foraging party led by Major John Doyle on October 3, 1780. Captain James Thompson and thirteen other local residents surrounded the party and ambushed them, causing the British to believe they were under attack of a large force. Soon after, British forces retreated from Charlotte.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p12, il
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Record #:
8968
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Abstract:
Although Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving in 1621, it was not until Abraham Lincoln officially made Thanksgiving the last Thursday in November that the holiday was celebrated with any regularity. This was in 1863 and, in 1941, after much confusion when FDR moved Thanksgiving to the third Thursday, Congress declared Thanksgiving to be held on the last Thursday of November, when it is still celebrated today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p9-11, il
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Record #:
8971
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Abstract:
The sweet pecan, now commonly found in the Southeast, is not native to the area. The trees are indigenous to Mississippi westward and then northward to the southern part of the Midwest. Pecan trees in Eastern North Carolina often do not grow in forests but rather around towns and farms where the ground is fertilized and minerals have been added to the soil. Most varieties require long hot summers and the majority of pecan groves are located in southeastern counties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p14-16, il
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Record #:
8970
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The McIntyre Historic Site was opened in October, 1976, just north of Charlotte. Visitors are invited to come and learn about the historical significance of the area as well as why Cornwallis dubbed Mecklenburg County “The Hornet's Nest.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p13, il
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Record #:
8974
Abstract:
Reverend Canon Patricius Cleery of Ireland came to New Bern about 1784 to settle his brother's estate. After a yellow fever epidemic broke out, Cleery never returned to Ireland, but stayed to offer relief to residents of New Bern. He fell victim to the illness himself and died in 1790. He was buried on the grounds of New Bern's Christ Episcopal Church. A new cross has recently been added to his tombstone to replace the original wooden one placed there the year of his death.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p22, il
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Record #:
8975
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Alice and Taylor Nance of Churchland bought a log cabin with eight acres of land about ten years ago. They renovated the house, putting electricity and insulation in themselves, and moved in while still working on it. Although originally intended as a summer retreat, the Nances now live in the restored five-room cabin.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p24, 35, il
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Record #:
8972
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Abstract:
On March 17, 1775, a group of nine North Carolina proprietors called the Transylvania Company participated in the largest private purchase of Indian land ever in North America. The Cherokee Indians sold some 22,000,000 acres of land to the men who immediately began colonizing it. After independence, Virginia governor Patrick Henry declared the deal null and void, and both Virginia and North Carolina each granted the men 200,000 acres.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p16-17, 39, il
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Record #:
8973
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Abstract:
Colonel C.L. Tew of South Carolina opened the Hillsboro Military Academy in Orange County in 1859. Enrollment increased as the war intensified, and, in 1865, the cadets were ordered to leave school and meet a regiment of raiders. The raiders, however, never came to the area and the students remained in their classrooms.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 6, Nov 1978, p19, 36, il
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