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8 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979
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Record #:
9048
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Abstract:
In 1784, a statue of George Washington was commissioned to be carved in the finest marble. Thomas Jefferson chose French sculptor Jean Antoine Houdon to complete the statue. It was dated 1788 but not received in Richmond, Virginia, until 1796. Hubard cast six bronze copies of the statue and the Gorham Company of New York has cast nineteen since 1909.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
9047
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1853, William James Hubard received authorization to make bronze copies of the Houdon statue of George Washington which has been in the Virginia capitol since 1796. Hubard offered the second copy of the statue to North Carolina, but because of conflicts within the General Assembly, it was not dedicated until July 1857. The statue stands on Capitol Square in Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
9050
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The Scituate Coach Works of New Bern is only six years old, but has customers all over the country. The shop, owned and operated by partners Earl Harting and Cyril Brook, specializes in restoring decayed antique automobiles. Harting completes all of the woodwork while Brook focuses on the car's body.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p14-15, il
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Record #:
9049
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Sassafras, used by Indians in teas and medicines, was one of the first goods exported to England from the American colonies. Although modern scientists say too much sassafras can be bad for the system, people who live in the mountains continue to drink it. Additionally, they make tea from cheery birch and spicewood.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p12-13, il
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Record #:
9051
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Standing in the yard of the old Lighthouse Keepers' Quarters on Ocracoke Island is an ancient cedar tree that resembles a bonsai tree. Iva and Monk Garrish, who lived in the house during the 1930s, called it their Courting Tree, a name that has stuck. Many Ocracoke visitors walk under the huge tree and marvel at its elegance.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
9052
Abstract:
Pictures of King George III and Queen Charlotte were returned to their home in the Salisbury tavern in 1977. During the Revolutionary War, American General Nathaniel Greene stopped by the tavern, owned by the Steele family, and wrote “O George, hide they face and mourn” on the back of his portrait. After Mrs. Steele's death, the portraits passed to David L. Swain, president of the University of North Carolina. The pictures were later auctioned to William J. Andrews in 1883, who kept the pictures in his family in California until 1977, when the Neel family, descendants of the Steeles, bought the portraits and returned them to the tavern wall.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p18-19, il
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Record #:
9053
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Abstract:
Built by Henry Warren, a miniature rock and mortar village called Shangri-La is a tourist attraction in Caswell County. The village contains over twenty buildings, and is most often visited by children and senior citizens. Warren died in 1977, but his wife continues to allow visitors to tour the village, although she does not charge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p20-21, 38, il, por
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Record #:
9054
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Abstract:
This article presents a letter from A. Gentry, a member of the 1854 North Carolina legislature, to his wife. The letter presents the problems of communication between Raleigh and the western counties at that time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p25
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