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8 results for The State Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976
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Record #:
9098
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Abstract:
A flask originally carried by a Revolutionary War soldier from North Carolina is in perfect condition and in the home of a descendant of the soldier in Paducah, KY. The soldier's name was Smothers and he was from North Carolina. In a painting of Washington looking at his troops at Valley Forge, a similar looking object can be seen dangling from a soldier. Although often a gill of rum was given to soldiers, perhaps they were also allowed to bring extra rum into battle.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p15, il
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Record #:
9097
Abstract:
Commonly called Tweetsie, the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad was the narrow-gauge common-carrier railroad that once ran from Boone into Tennessee. It was one of the last steam rails in the country, and was almost the last narrow-gauge freight road when its last track was taken out of North Carolina in 1950 due to annual operating losses.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p9-11, il
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Record #:
9100
Abstract:
Buck Creek Mill near Highlands was used to grind flour in the 1890s, but today is home of the Frog and Owl Cafe. Jerri and Mark Rosenstein bought the mill in 1972 and opened the cafe the following summer. Now in its fifth year, the cafe specializes in French cuisine and the menu changes daily. The Rosensteins study French cooking so as to offer more diversity to their food.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p18-19, 28, il
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Record #:
9099
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Abstract:
Squire Boone, father of Daniel Boone, moved to Davie County in 1754 and brought his blacksmith shop with him. His shop soon became the center of activity for the settlement, where Boone made axes and stakes using his anvil and forge. Boone's axes were sold as far north as Pennsylvania.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p16-17, 42, il
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Record #:
9103
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Abstract:
The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament began eighteen years ago and is held each June in Morehead City. This year's winner was Bob Donovan of Rockville, Maryland. His blue marlin was 140 inches long and weighed 575 pounds. His crew split the $1,200 prize money.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p29-31, il
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Record #:
9102
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Jabez Whitaker built the first hospital in Jamestown in 1621. The 20-foot x 40-foot building was called the Sickhouse and records of it appear in “Records of the Virginia Company.” Whitaker was the great-great-great-grandfather of John Whitaker, a Wake County Judge elected in 1776.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p26-27
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Record #:
9101
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Although some writers claim Blackbeard was benevolent, the anonymous author of THIRTEEN LETTERS FROM A GENTLEMAN TO HIS FRIEND, published in 1740, says Blackbeard was brutal. This article is the first of a two-part story detailing Blackbeard's most violent acts.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p20-23, 28, il
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Record #:
9118
Author(s):
Abstract:
Captain Thorvald Peders of Wilmington has been aboard sailing ships since becoming a U.S. citizen in 1914. Today, Peders spends his time building miniature ships and sliding them into bottles, a hobby he picked up while at sea. The miniatures are made with old-fashioned tools including pocketknives and sewing needles. Peders works with pine and mahogany, and his work reminds him of the years he spent on the ocean.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 2, July 1976, p12-13, il
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