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4 results for The State Vol. 43 Issue 6, Nov 1975
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Record #:
11643
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1974, the North Carolina Zoo at Asheboro spent $20,000 providing food for its 125 animals. This year the amount is expected to be over $35,000. Andy Lucker, operations manager of the 1,165-acre zoo, says inflation, causing hay to double in price, has contributed to increased expenses. Donations made by local farmers help, and zoo officials hope to begin growing vegetables and grain on zoo land within a year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 6, Nov 1975, p18-19, il
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Record #:
11641
Abstract:
When Southern Pines was first settled, walking was the only form of transportation. Wagons and bicycles came next, and a number of livery stables encouraged Northern settlers to bring their horses with them. Ox-mobiles and trolleys followed. Croquet tournaments became a popular pastime, as did bowling. The Northern health-seekers brought a lot of their region with them and left a lot behind when they returned home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 6, Nov 1975, p10-12, 35, il
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Record #:
11642
Author(s):
Abstract:
The new North Carolina Supreme Court seal, designed by Ricky D. Horton of Concord, was adopted on October 14, 1975. The Latin phrase \"Suum Cuique\" has been amended to \"Suum Cuique Tribuere,\" thus changing the meaning from \"to each his own\" to \"to give to everyone his due.\" The seal will appear on all official court documents.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 6, Nov 1975, p13-14, il
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Record #:
11644
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1901, Abraham Bowden of Alamance County dismantled a tobacco barn constructed in the 1800s. He built as one-room home for his wife and himself, and they resided there until her death in 1911. The cabin was built without windows due to Bowden's fear of being shot. The Zachery family bought it in 1917 for $50. Weathered by time and known now as the Abe Cabin, it stills stands in the Snow Camp community.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 6, Nov 1975, p22-24, il
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