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7 results for The State Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974
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Record #:
9985
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Abstract:
Willie Jones, a wealthy pre-Revolution aristocrat began his political career as a Royalist but deferred summons from his Majesty's Council of the Province to join radicals in support of the Revolution. Jones was known for his leadership abilities and acted as a virtual governor as president of the Council of Safety during the war. Jones was also instrumental in founding Raleigh, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p7-8, por
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Record #:
9988
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Abstract:
The Civilian Conservation Corps was one of the many government funded programs of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, effectuated to combat nationwide poverty during the Great Depression. The Corps' many significant conservationist contributions included clearing trails and roads in the mountains of North Carolina, planting millions of trees, and controlling forest fires.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p12-16, por
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Record #:
9986
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Major L. P. McLendon, of Greensboro, revives the 1944 tale regarding a mysterious Portuguese man claiming to have found a cheap and more efficient substitute for gasoline by relaying Josephus Daniels' first-hand account. Daniels met the Portuguese while serving as Secretary of the Navy. The man's inexplicable disappearance is the subject of much debate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p9-10, por
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Record #:
9987
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Abstract:
The 37-foot wide, one-car Knobbs Creek Bridge was closed--rather, the drawbridge was permanently opened to allow boat traffic. A new road from another direction now connects travelers to the Elizabeth City area. Bridge tender Sam Powell's family had operated the drawbridge since its construction in 1904.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p11, por
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Record #:
9989
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Abstract:
With the coming of the Kohoutek comet and the slight seismic rumblings that often follow comet sightings, North Carolinians were reminded of the famed comet that preceded the New Madrid, Missouri, Earthquake in 1811 which caused the Mississippi River to flow backwards for a time. Also brought to mind was the famous Indian orator, Tecumseh, who prophesied with the coming of the same comet, the rallying of the Indian nations against the Americans.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
9990
Author(s):
Abstract:
Judge Spencer A. Martin, having lived much of his life in Arkansas, settled his home in Spruce Pine, North Carolina. Judge Martin served in the Arkansas House of Representatives and was eventually appointed county judge. Martin was once Confederate prisoner of war after sustaining a wound to the collarbone.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p20-21, 24, por
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Record #:
9991
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Abstract:
In the early 1900s, the razorback hog proved tenacious wild game for hunters around Whiteside Cove.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 9, Feb 1974, p22-23
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