NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for The State Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9899
Abstract:
Countess Aviso Gozzi, otherwise known as Elsie McNeill, as an art student from Fayetteville, followed her passion for fabrics and décor to Venice, Italy where she bought famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny's business Fortuny Fabricca, one of the most prestigious fabric businesses in the world. She also owns Fortuny, Inc. in New York.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p15, 20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9898
Author(s):
Abstract:
The custom of the duel continued with the colonists in America and eventually in North Carolina. Though forbade by legislature in 1802, duels persisted in North Carolina regularly until the end of the Civil War which marked a dramatic decline. North Carolina's eighth governor and Constitution signer, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., was killed in a duel with John Stanly over a political quarrel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p10-14, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9901
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Newbold-White House, north of Hertford was restored by the Perquimans County Restoration Association. The brick house is said to be the North Carolina's oldest, built somewhere between 1685 and 1725. The house-now-tourist attraction includes a museum containing several thousand artifacts from the 1700s found by archaeologists during the restoration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p17-18, 33, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9959
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Arthur Smith Show was one of the most popular programs at the time, delivering country, folk, and bluegrass music to audiences nationwide. Among numerous enterprises, Arthur Smith's time was divided largely between his Charlotte-based touring group the Crackerjacks and recording studio.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p19-20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Popular country-western singer George Hamilton IV, deemed “International Ambassador of Country Music” after garnering much success in Canada and England, decided to trade Nashville and the Grand Ol' Opry for a spot in Arthur Smith's Charlotte-based group, the Crackerjacks.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9961
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parachutists flock to Franklin Airfield to sky dive at the Franklin County Parachute Center. Here, skydivers can earn their Class A license after completing 25 free falls in an approved manner. More seasoned jumpers can earn the Jump Master or Instructor licenses.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p21-25, por
Full Text:
Record #:
9962
Author(s):
Abstract:
At Southport once stood the Cape Fear Quarantine Station. The center operated from the 1890s to the mid-1900s, disinfecting vessels and confining contagious passengers in attempts to stave the spreading of infectious diseases.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p28-30, por
Full Text:
Record #:
12322
Author(s):
Abstract:
\"Old No. 1,\" an American LaFrance steamer built in 1878, was the first piece of fire-fighting equipment purchased by the City of Rocky Mount. The town bought it in 1893 after a devastating fire that almost destroyed the town. Two horses pulled the steamer. The time required to get it operating was approximately thirty minutes. In spite of the activation time, the steamer was crucial in saving many town properties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p16, 42, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12321
Abstract:
Countess Aviso Gozzi, otherwise known as Elsie McNeill, as an art student from Fayetteville, followed her passion for fabrics and decor to Venice, Italy where she bought famed Spanish artist Mariano Fortuny's business Fortuny Fabricca, one of the most prestigious fabric businesses in the world. She also owns Fortuny, Inc. in New York.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p15, 20, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The custom of the duel continued with the colonists in America and eventually in North Carolina. Though forbidden legislature in 1802, duels persisted in North Carolina regularly until the end of the Civil War; then the practice dramatically declined. North Carolina's eighth governor and Constitution signer, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., was killed in a duel with John Stanly over a political quarrel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p10-14, il, por
Subject(s):
Full Text: