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8 results for The State Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974
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Record #:
10073
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After Lincoln's assassination, North Carolina-born Vice President Andrew Johnson faced insurmountable challenges as the newly appointed southern Democrat President. Johnson wished to follow Lincoln's precedent in preserving the Union and to make Reconstruction as swift as possible, but radicals in Congress such as Thaddeus Stevens wished to treat the seceded states as a conquered nation. These radicals opposed Johnson at every turn and after multiple failed attempts to impeach the President, finally succeeded. Johnson later served as a Tennessee Senator where he was instrumental in getting legislation passed that changed the succession line making the Speaker of the House follow the Vice President.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p9-14, il, por
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Record #:
10074
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The phasing out of public school auditoriums in North Carolina marks the end of an era for some. Auditoriums were most often used for morning assemblies that set the tone for the day, but were also often used as venues for gatherings and cultural performances. Many public schools have converted these auditoriums to classrooms, libraries, and kindergarten departments. These assemblies created a unifying morale among the student body.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p14, 43
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Record #:
10075
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During the oil shortage panic of the 1970s, large and small oil companies began searching all over America for possible oil wells, including along North Carolina's coastline in Dare, Currituck, Camden, Hyde, and Tyrrell Counties. Small communities like Stumpy Point experienced a boom in real estate prices with the rumors of possible natural gas. Most rumors proved false and the wells unprofitable.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p15-16, por
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Record #:
10077
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North Carolina's proposed state park at Merchants Millpond in Gates County began in April 1972. The scenic wilderness is reminiscent of Cypress Gardens, the Everglades, and Okefenokee. The article gives an account of the area's natural beauty witnessed via canoe trip.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p18-20, por
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Record #:
10076
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A gravestone commemorating Aunt Abby House was erected deep in the woods of Franklin County where a crude wooden marker once stood. The inscription reads: “Aunt Abby House, Angel of Mercy to the Confederate Soldiers, Died April 30, 1881.” The stone was fashioned after those placed on Confederate soldiers' graves by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p17, 23, por
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Record #:
10078
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The second national hang glider meet known as the Tactile Flight Meet was held June 29-30 on the sand dunes in Nags Head. Hang gliders prize their sport that affords a more natural flight that allows the tactile sensations birds must feel, lost on modern-day aviators who pilot fast-moving encapsulated crafts.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p21-22, por
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Record #:
10080
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Farmers once waited until after the “sheepshearing rain,” a period in late April/early May when spring showers were through, to sheer their sheep so the “de-wooled” animals might not become chilled and develop sickness. Modern day farmers like Arthur Gambill from near Sparta in Alleghany County generally sheer the animals of their wool by feel, whenever the weather seems warm enough.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p24-25, por
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Record #:
10079
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A group of Winston-Salem artists organized Art Gallery Originals, an accessible gallery that brings local artists to the people and people to the artists. Prices for the original works range from $10 to $1,200 and vary in style from abstract to conventional/realistic, showcasing both traditional and modern pieces.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 12, May 1974, p22-23, por
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