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2 results for The State Vol. 39 Issue 6, Aug 1971
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Record #:
12284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Today most coastal piers in North Carolina from Kitty Hawk to the South Carolina line were erected for the convenience and dollar of the fishing public, but in 1910 when the first ocean pier was built at Wrightsville Beach, the effort intended to enhance the cultural arts of southeastern North Carolina. Then known as \"The Playground of Dixie,\" the recently built pavilion, called Lumina, drew great crowds from daily passenger trains at the Union Station in Wilmington. The pier stretched 700 feet into the ocean and was 30 feet wide.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 6, Aug 1971, p12, il
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Record #:
12283
Abstract:
Pre-Civil War slave rebellions were not uncommon in North Carolina. Across northeastern North Carolina in the spring of 1802 rumors of a slave uprising abounded. \"The Coleraine Letter\" and other plots, real or imagined, launched the worst insurrection panic in North Carolina history. The plot, however, was uncovered. Trials in Hertford and Bertie counties resulted in the hanging of eleven slaves and the whipping and deportation of others.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 6, Aug 1971, p7-10, 19, il, por, map
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