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3 results for The State Vol. 31 Issue 13, Nov 1963
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Record #:
11917
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Abstract:
A county whose land is largely considered to be classified as forests, up to 70 percent, Caswell was, at one time, an industrial region that profited from slave labor through tobacco and cotton production. Although much of the region's wealth was broken up during emancipation, Caswell County is famous for the Slade tobacco curing method, the Kirk-Holden War, and for whiskey distilleries. Caswell County in the 20th century consists of colleges, medical centers, research centers, golf courses, factories, and shopping centers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 13, Nov 1963, p16-18, 24-26, il
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Record #:
11916
Author(s):
Abstract:
Transitioning from a regional to a national university, Duke University is currently undergoing major renovations. Outside of spending over $11.2 million dollars on new buildings and an additional $1.2 million on the first purpose built oceanographic research vessel ever constructed in the United States, Duke has a new president. Replacing Dr. Deryl Hart, Dr. Douglas Maitland Knight, will work on continuing to expand the facilities of the Duke complex, propelling the university into competition with institutions such as Yale, Harvard, and Princeton.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 13, Nov 1963, p15, 28, il, por
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Record #:
11915
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Abstract:
Reportedly pushed ashore by porpoises, a female sperm whale, measuring 54 feet 2 inches in length, by 33 feet in circumference, and weighing approximately fifty tons, arrived on Wrightsville Beach on April 5th, 1928. Remaining on the beach for nine subsequent days due to bad weather and failed removal attempts, the beached whale drew in more tourism than any other single event in Wilmington's history. The bones of the whale were cleaned, preserved, and taken to the North Carolina Museum of Natural History for display.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 13, Nov 1963, p11-12, il
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