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8 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961
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Record #:
12054
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the lean, bitter years after the Civil War, many North Carolinians loyal to the Union cause filed claims with the United States Congress for damages. The three man board-of-commissioners set up to process the flood of damage claims from the South consisted of men from Vermont, New York, and Iowa. Of the 22,000 claims totaling $60 million, payments reached only $4 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p7, 11, il
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Record #:
12056
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the series painted by Francis V. Kughler for the Institute of Government building in Chapel Hill, the painting of King Charles and the Lords Proprietors was one of two murals carried out in England. Kughler discusses the arrangement of the King and his Proprietors in the painting, as well as his historical research, and the inspiration behind his third mural.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p6, 11
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Record #:
12665
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Foard, president of Kluttz rings of Gastonia, likely knows more about 12-pound Gun-Howitzers than many Confederate and Union soldiers who used them during the Civil War. An old artilleryman himself, Foard has specialized in the study of weapons used during the Civil War. Foard's research included trips to battlefields, as well as obtaining information on the gun from French archives.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p11, por
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Record #:
12669
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last week, thousands of members of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) held their annual meeting, finding only ridicule and distortion of the event in the resulting media reports. Such treatment tends to confirm the DAR's contention that freedom of the press in America has degenerated into freedom to misrepresent.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p21
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Record #:
12667
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the lean, bitter years after the Civil War, many North Carolinians loyal to the Union cause filed claims with the United States Congress for damages. The three man board-of-commissioners set up to process the flood of damage claims from the South consisted of men from Vermont, New York, and Iowa. Of the 22,000 claims totaling $60 million, payments reached only $4 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p7, 11, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12671
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the ninth story of the Moravian series, the author discusses the strict controls exercised by two groups in Salem. As the community began to prosper, simple communal living was abandoned resulting in new forms of control for the spiritual and financial matters of the society. The Aeltesten Conferenz was responsible for the spiritual affairs of the congregation, while the Aufseher Collegium was established to look after the secular, or financial, affairs of the community.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p8
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Record #:
12672
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina boasts the largest sport-fishing fleet on the eastern coast operated by one man, Ottis Purifoy. Purifoy's \"Lucky Seven,\"Â┬Łoperated out of Morehead City, is comprised now of nine boats with another currently being built. In addition to providing boats and guides, Purifoy has a fish house where he can clean and ice the catch, providing an outlet for his commercial fishing business as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p36, por
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Record #:
13439
Abstract:
Although not known as a railroad center, North Carolina has a great profusion of short-line railroads. With slightly over twenty short-lines running, North Carolina can justly claim the title, \"Land of the Little Railroads.\" Primarily owned by small companies, these railroads operate under their own names, independently of any major system.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p9-11, il
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