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6 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962
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Record #:
12766
Abstract:
Denton, Midway, and other smaller communities in Davidson County are located in the middle of a vacuum, and so have a large trading area from which to draw trade. These small communities, seen as rural trading centers, include Healing Springs, Eller, Pilot, and Tyro to name a few.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p21, il
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Record #:
12765
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davidson has been on the mainline for ages, many adventurers and travelers chronicling their stays in the region. One of the first to visit, German doctor John Lederer, came on an exploration trip from Virginia in May of 1670. His account chronicles his trip to Sara, in the vicinity of the trading path that crossed the Yadkin River, a route used by modern travelers today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p8-10, 26, il, por
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Record #:
12768
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Fleer, founder of Chiclet gum, came to Davidson before World War I, but his outspoken German sentiments during the war caused him to sell his interests in the company. Dan Boone came to North Carolina in 1750, building a prototype of what became a perpetual cabin building program. This and other North Carolina stories are listed by author Paul Pleasants.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p11-12, 31, il
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Record #:
12769
Abstract:
The presence of the North Carolina Railway in Davidson spurred the development of the Thomasville Chair Company, the county's largest industry. John W. Thomas, a Whig and advocate of internal improvements, bought land and founded a store and sawmill in the county in 1852. Thomasville went through various phases of industrial development, including tobacco and mining.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p17-19, il
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Record #:
12767
Abstract:
Although the Davidson frontier lacked many of the luxuries and refinements of life, the early residents managed to fare well at the table, as resources were varied and abundant. Remembering their pious and disciplined upbringing, many of the German settlers thrived. The frontier minister was important to the settlers, although they often held services led by the schoolteacher or elders of the church.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p19, 23, il
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Record #:
13452
Abstract:
When Davidson was formed, Lexington became the county seat and commenced a process of methodical growth still experienced today. Inhabited by a mix of Pennsylvania Dutch and Scotch-Irish, Lexington was named in honor of the Battle of Lexington in 1775. Lexington's primary industries became textiles and furniture, while its recreation is found in politics.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 19, Feb 1962, p15-16, il
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