NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Francis V. Kughler discusses the design and creation of his ninth mural Crusade for Education. The mural, created for the Institute of Government building in Chapel Hill, represents Governor Aycock of North Carolina addressing an audience in the state capital in his crusade for education ca. 1900. Kughler discusses his historical research, and the study of human subjects which aided in the creation of his latest work.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p8
Full Text:
Record #:
12757
Author(s):
Abstract:
Furniture and hosiery still play an important part in High Point's economy, and today it is also the acknowledged furniture marketing center of the world. In 1951, the Chamber of Commerce expanded High Point's fame by adding the High Point Industrial Development Division, its purpose to survey existing industry to determine the needs for broadening the city's economy and attract new industries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p9, 18, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12756
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although opposed to the idea, Western Electric employee Hank Snyder came to North Carolina to open several plants for the company. Along with other industrialists, he believed Southerners were slow and not adapted to factory work. Snyder was later astonished when North Carolina workers not only equaled production in the northern plants, but exceeded it.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p11, por
Full Text:
Record #:
12755
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burke Davis recalls some fabulous stories about North Carolinian George Penny, horse-trader, businessman, and politician. The stories include Penny's work in the mill at Randleman as a boy, and his first experiences as a horse trader.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p10
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12762
Abstract:
In 1880, a correspondent and artist for LESLIE'S ILLUSTRATED came to Raleigh to interview General Joseph E. Johnston, commander of the last Confederate Army in the field, surrendering near Durham. Joseph's surrender to General Sherman occurred April 26, 1865.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p16-17, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pinehurst, defying the usual fate of old resorts, shows no sign of decay and decline, but has grown in popularity and prosperity over the years. Its growth continues with its connection by scheduled airline from Raleigh, tapping both the east and Midwest airlines. This year for the first time, the corporation will inaugurate s summer season, making Pinehurst a year-round resort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p29
Full Text:
Record #:
12763
Abstract:
The original boundary line between North and South Carolina, established more than two centuries ago, was proved by a stately pine tree aged more than 350 years. Until about thirty-five years ago, the exact boundary line between the two states, especially near the ocean and Lumber River, was in dispute. The original survey of the line was completed in a most inaccurate manner.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 18, Feb 1962, p13-14, il
Subject(s):
Full Text: