NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for The State Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12847
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lord Granville, wealthy land owner in the North Carolina Colony, attempted to augment the population of the region by recruiting Moravian settlers. In response, August Gottlieb Spangenberg, also known as Brother Joseph, departed Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, on 25 August 1752, accompanied by five men, in search of a new settlement area in North Carolina. Returning to Bethlehem on 2 February 1753, Spangenberg was successful, having located an unclaimed tract of land encompassing approximately 100,000 acres, outside of Muddy Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p15-16, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12845
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Power Company's new dam on the Catawba River will form the much anticipated Lake Norman. In an effort to save some of the heritage that will be lost, efforts were focused on moving one of the great houses of the antebellum period, the Elmwood house. Inhabited by the Graham family, members of the river gentry, the Elmwood House, now in the care of Mr. And Mrs. Charles Babcock, will be relocated to the Winston-Salem area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p11, 30, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12846
Abstract:
Amassing a population of nearly 5,000 members by the turn of the 18th-century, the Catawba Native Americans, named for the river region they inhabited, have disbanded. The tribal reservation, valued at nearly $250,000 will be sold and the proceeds divided amongst the remaining 650 Catawba.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12848
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first commercially constructed fallout shelters in North Carolina are underway. Contained within the new First Federal Savings and Loan Building in Raleigh as well as in the People's Savings and Loan Building in Wilmington, the fallout shelters will be outfitted with emergency equipment and could potentially protect over 350 individuals should the need arise.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p33, 36, 38, il
Full Text: