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19 results for The State Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958
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Record #:
11946
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For North Carolinians, the miracle of the first flight is that it somehow occurred in this state. Wilbur and Orville Wright needed a place where their wings could be spread wide and where the winds would lift those wings into soaring flight. After consulting with weather stations, and Kitty Hawk postmaster Captain William J. Tate, North Carolina became the chosen spot for their first flight.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p19-21, por
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Record #:
11947
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The story of the Cherokees, their past, their curious present, and their uncertain future is illustrated by author Bill Sharpe. Sharpe recounts their early history and their expansion into the south, the wars with the Carolina colonists, the 1924 plans to disband the tribes, the vanishing Cherokee communities, and trade with tourists.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p60-64, por
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Record #:
11948
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A list of all the North Carolina counties and the origin of their names is listed alphabetically in this article. From Alamance County to Yancey, the dates and inspiration for these names hold a long history of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p53-56
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Record #:
12187
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The legends revolving around the origin of the work \"Tar Heel\" are numerous and confusing. The two most frequently cited yarns come from explanations in Clark's North Carolina Regiments (1901), and Creecy's Grandfather's Tales of North Carolina History (1901). Both versions were written long after the supposed events, and refer to the Civil War era, when the North Carolina soldiers were presumably noted for not retreating from advanced positions that they gained a reputation of having tar on their heels, incapacitating their flight in the heat of battle.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p97
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Record #:
12185
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One of the most sensational and best known duels fought on American soil was that which took place between Andrew Jackson and Charles Dickinson on May 30, 1806. Dickinson was the aggressor, provoking Jackson with his disparaging remarks. Jackson responded with a challenge and the two men faced each other for a duel, Jackson perhaps winning due to the clever addition of a rule constricting the position of their firing arms.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p109-110, por
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Record #:
12186
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In this day and time when basketball has been streamlined from top to bottom and you sometimes see a team score enough points to run into three figures, it is a distinct novelty and almost unbelievable when a team plays for forty minutes during the course of a game and is able to only score one point. But that is actually what happened in a game of basketball played between Guilford College and Trinity College in the Angier Duke Gymnasium January 31, 1907.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p105
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Record #:
12184
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The story of North Carolina's most infamous group of outlaws comes from Robeson County, recounting the terror caused by Henry Berry Lowry. Between 1864 and 1872, the Lowry Gang struck often and viciously from its lair in the swamps around Pembroke (previously Scuffletown). The tale of terror tracks Henry Lowry's life, the organization of his gang, his capture, and sentencing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p129
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Record #:
12181
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One of the great milestones in North Carolina's progress was Governor Aycock's inaugural address to the General Assembly delivered at a joint session held in the State Capitol in Raleigh on January 15, 1901. Governor Aycock's entire speech is reprinted in this issue of The State, addressing education, taxes, and equality.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p81-82
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Record #:
12188
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A portion of George Washington's diary, in which he tells of his trip through North Carolina and gives his impression of some of the things he saw, is reprinted in The State. The excerpt begins with Washington's 1791 trip to Halifax. Washington describes his impressions of the topography and the river trade, moving on to describe his trip to Ashe, Tarboro, New Bern, and Wilmington.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p122-128, il
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Record #:
12628
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At Bentonville, a brilliant group of Confederate officers led a dwindling army against Sherman's hordes, and a desperate gamble almost succeeded. Author Manly Wellman describes the modern day terrain of the battlefield, adding a map for emphasis, while outlining the battle -- possibly the last blow for Confederate freedom in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p99-100, 130, map
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Record #:
12629
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Author Goerch retells the story of Joe Dosier, a North Carolina man fond of practical jokes, and the crew of sailors that sought their revenge. Dosier's tale begins with his fellow sailors' displeasure of his practical jokes, and his their eventual retaliation as they imprison him in a barrel on the deck of a ship. During a sudden storm, Dosier was washed overboard and subjected to a harrowing journey before his eventual rescue.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p79
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Record #:
12630
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It was the craziest thing Graham County had ever seen, and the tale of the mountain-top ranch with its odd farm stock is still talked about throughout the Smokies. George Moore, often called the \"Mystery Man of Wall Street,\" completed construction of a large ranch on the top of the remote Hooper Bald, deep in the Snowbird Mountains, and supplied his lands with an odd sock of eight buffalo, 16 elk, 200 wild turkeys, and 34 bear.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p41-44
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Record #:
12637
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The unfortunate burial of Squire Lewis is a tale of the burial of an organ, its outer box thought to be the casket of Mr. Lewis. At a time when communication was slow, and unreliable, his family thought his recent stay in the hospital had taken a turn for the worse, never receiving the news that he had in fact recovered. Upon Mr. Lewis' return, and everyone's surprise at his unexpected appearance, the squire realized the organ was in fact buried in the family graveyard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p45-46, il
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Record #:
12631
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Towering 6,684 feet above sea level, North Carolina's Mount Mitchell is the highest peak in Eastern America. On the summit is a North Carolina State Park in which no point is less than a mile above sea level. From many points along the Blue Ridge Parkway, there are superlative views of Mitchell and its rugged neighboring peaks in the Black Mountain Range between Asheville and Spruce Pine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p51-52, il
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Record #:
12635
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The eternal mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colonists is still North Carolina's No. 1 Story. First published in \"American Heritage,\" Powell's article tells the story of North Carolina from Sir Walter Raleigh's 1584 land patent, to the settling on Roanoke Island, and finally the return of Lane and Grenville to the colony only to find it abandoned.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p9-10, por
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