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8 results for The State Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958
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Record #:
11936
Abstract:
An excerpt of S. T. Pearce's \"Zeb's Black Baby,\" a history of Vance County is reprinted in this article detailing the court trial of a misidentified husband. Arrested for bigamy and nonsupport of his children in 1923, John Bunyan Rawls was mistakenly identified as J. Bynum Reid and escaped conviction by the Vance County jury only narrowly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p12, 36
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Record #:
11935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Found off the coast of North Carolina, the feared barracuda generally haunt the wreckage of ships. Many of the wrecks are old blockade runners sunk during the War Between the States, others more recent wrecks, such as the petroleum tanker Esso Nashville, sunk by a German U-boat during World War II. Sports fishermen enjoy the aggressive, energetic movements of the barracuda as they skip bait across the water, catching specimens at times weighing more than forty pounds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p8-9, 16, por
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Record #:
11937
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Abstract:
A traveler surveys the North Carolina scene, giving advice to would be travelers in the continuing extract from Ziegler and Crosscup's 1881 travel book, \"Heart of the Alleghanies.\" The travelers survey the Catawba Valley, commenting on the Piedmont regions significant agricultural contribution to the area, including crops of corn, wheat, oats, vegetables, and the lucrative tobacco.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p10
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Record #:
11939
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Abstract:
Old Trudge lists the many superlatives of Western North Carolina for those tourists seeking wonder and adventure. Trudge lists the many sightseeing spots of the area, including but not limited to, Mount Mitchell, the Biltmore Estate and Gardens at Asheville, the mineral museum on Blue Ridge Parkway, and the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p17-18, por
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Record #:
11940
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Abstract:
Since the construction of 41,000 miles of super highways now links the nation in the form of an Interstate Highway System, the average citizen should be concerned with ways to attain income through its use. Recently, American Trucking Association (ATA) researchers set out to discover the potential of garnering income by studying representative sections of the new highway. In North Carolina, researchers studied a 33.3-mile section of highway, concluding it not only pays its own way, but returns an annual profit of $893,093.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p33-34, por
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Record #:
11941
Abstract:
Aunt Sadie Bryson of Jackson County has been using herbs to treat the sick for forty years. Aunt Sadie learned about herbs from ancestors, as well as her own experimentation, using her knowledge to help neighbors during periods the county doctor was unable to make house calls.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p7, 22, por
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Record #:
12626
Author(s):
Abstract:
An excerpt of S. T. Pearce's \"Zeb's Black Baby,\" a history of Vance County is reprinted in this article detailing the court trial of a misidentified husband. Arrested for bigamy and nonsupport of his children in 1923, John Bunyan Rawls was mistakenly identified as J. Bynum Reid and escaped conviction by the Vance County jury only narrowly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p12, 36
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Record #:
13434
Author(s):
Abstract:
Penland, a handicraft instruction center in the mountains of Mitchell County, is considered a rare North Carolina institution. Growing steadily in the seventy-five years since its construction, Penland was originally created to bring the art of weaving back to the hills and increase the income of mountain families. The institute now attracts people from all over the world to learn crafts never before popular in the Mitchell hills.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p13, 16, por
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