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4 results for The State Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957
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Record #:
12205
Abstract:
The General Assembly of North Carolina ruled that banker ponies, as well as any other wild live stock on Core Bank, must be removed due to beach erosion directly related to the animal's presence. On a similar note, previous bans on cultivation of the indigenous plant, the Venus fly trap, have been lifted. Although still illegal to harvest wild specimens, the Assembly ruled that nurseries and individuals may cultivate the plant on their property for commercial sales.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957, p16, il
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Record #:
12203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Filling a void during the absence of professional musicians in North Carolina, the Moravians have shared and emanated their love of music through several centuries. Brought to the New Word during the period of settlement, the Moravians utilized the organ, piano, harpsichord, clavichord, harp, fiboline, cello, and viola, to glorify god and express their religious sentiments.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957, p9-10, 24, il
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Record #:
12204
Author(s):
Abstract:
Archaeological site looter as well as local cartoonist, Carl Spencer, has amassed a collection of Native American finds collected from riverine environments in North Carolina. Included in his collection are arrowheads, spear points, fishing spears, tomahawks, axes, and a small bowl though to be used for mixing war paint.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957, p15, il, por
Subject(s):
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Record #:
12206
Abstract:
Drawing in thousands of tourists to Greensboro, North Carolina's Brick Industry Research House is open for interested spectators. Completely evolved from research and fundamentally new in concept, the medium-priced home adorned with expensive comforts is marketed toward the middle class. Low in maintenance and operating costs, the brick concept house encompasses 1,500 square feet. Plans are available from Brick & Tile Service, Inc., Greensboro, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 9, Sept 1957, p34, il
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