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6 results for The State Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956
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Record #:
12139
Abstract:
In 1825, the State of North Carolina engaged the services of Hamilton Fulton, described as a distinguished engineer from England, to ascertain the importance, practicability, and expenses of re-opening the inlet at or near Nag's Head. Fulton's report favored changes and commenced a quarter century of agitation to accomplish the most state's ambitious and fascinating project to that time. This article is a two-part series and the first part of this series can be found in the following issue, October 1956, Vol. 24, No. 11, p9-10.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p10-11, il
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Record #:
12138
Abstract:
The largest pump in the world has just been installed in Cherokee County. Capable of pumping 1,750,000 gallons of water per minute, the pump was installed at TVA's Hiwassee Dam and will serve as a combined pump and turbine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p9, il
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Record #:
12141
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School, located in Brasstown, North Carolina, is well known for programs in wood carving, folk dancing, folk singing, puppets, dramatics, and record playing. Encompassing a 366-acre farm, the Campbell Folk School serves as an adult education center and performs a short program of community services.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p23, il
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Record #:
12140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Containing a series of photos that depict North Carolina farm living conditions in 1840, this is not an article but rather a few photos that depict a particular property from the period.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p12-13, il
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Record #:
12142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located on the Hiwassee River, in North Carolina, the Peachtree Indian Mound and Village is home to a marker that signifies this area as not only an occupation point of local Cherokee Native Americans but also a location visited by De Soto during the Spanish Expedition of 1540. Two archaeological excavations have produced numerous finds indicating a continued Cherokee population from 1300 AD through 1540.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p26
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Record #:
12143
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formed in 1839 from lands obtained from local Native Americans via the Treaty of New Echota, Cherokee County is the southwestern most province in North Carolina. Encompassing 454 square miles, Cherokee is home to several ceremonial mounds, the most famous of which is Peachtree. The only county in North Carolina to ever operate off Central Standard Time, Cherokee County is better known for mining industries and the site of Ft. Baker.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 12, Nov 1956, p27-36, il, map
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