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4 results for The State Vol. 23 Issue 8, Sept 1955
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Record #:
13088
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of Buncombe Hall is described with reference to its construction for Colonel Edward Buncombe, the life and times of Colonel Buncombe, and the passing of the Hall during marriages and deaths.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 8, Sept 1955, p16, 18, 26
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Record #:
13089
Author(s):
Abstract:
This section of the map completes the coastal area, featuring prominently Brunswick County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 8, Sept 1955, p17, map
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Record #:
15650
Author(s):
Abstract:
deLue, the travel editor of the Boston Globe, continues his trip through eastern North Carolina. He stopped in Washington to learn how Dimock Street in Roxbury, Massachusetts got its name. Born in Washington, North Carolina, Susan Dimock became the first woman member of the North Carolina Medical Society, although she never practiced medicine in the state. Refused admission to medical colleges in Boston, she applied to a Swiss university, was accepted, and graduated with a degree. She returned to Boston and became well established in her profession. She established the country's first School of Nursing at the New England Hospital for Women. On a voyage to Europe, she was lost in a shipwreck off the coast of England.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 8, Sept 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
15649
Author(s):
Abstract:
Time spent in a Civil War prisoner of war camp was never pleasant for soldiers on either side. Sigma, the pen name of a Civil War Confederate soldier, recounts one of the few humorous incidents that occurred in a Federal prison camp. It appeared in The Tarboro Southerner on September 11, 1879, and describes the time Confederate soldiers captured the Fort Warren prisoner of war camp in Boston Harbor and held it for twenty-four hours.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 8, Sept 1955, p9-10, il
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