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4 results for The State Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954
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Record #:
13158
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recently divided into several real estate developments, Topsail Island, located between New River Inlet and New Topsail Inlet, is the longest stretch of coastline in North Carolina entirely surrounded by water. Located in Onslow Bay, Topsail Island is removed from river sources, making it a premier spot for clear water and fishing. Used as an early cargo port as well as by the Navy during war, Topsail Island has a varied history that extends throughout the 20th-century.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954, p20, 25-27, 29, 31, il, map
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Record #:
13156
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comprising nine lines and carrying approximately 327,586 passengers annually, the North Carolina ferry system uses a combination of old and new vessels to transport people and cars across state waters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954, p15-16, il
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Record #:
13157
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recognizing North Carolinians playing in the National and American Baseball Leagues, this article mentions 33 natives, their places of birth, current residences, teams played for, and respective positions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954, p18
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Record #:
15673
Author(s):
Abstract:
MacNeill recounts the beginning of weather forecasting from Cape Hatteras when George Onslow, a civilian employee of the Signal Corp of the U.S. Army, arrived in 1883. He was the first man to sign his name to an official weather report dispatched from Hatteras Island on August 15, 1883. MacNeill explains why the Hatteras area is one of the most difficult for weather forecasting.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 1, June 1954, p12-13, 33, il, por
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