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5 results for The Researcher Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010
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Record #:
34786
Author(s):
Abstract:
A painting of a schooner by artist D.G. Bell was discovered in a Florida garage, dated to 1934. Interested in the work’s history, the owner began chasing leads on the art’s origins by contacting Carteret County citizens whose names were listed on the backside of the painting. One of the names, Tibbie Roberts, yielded answers. Ms. Roberts confirmed that the painting had been given to a local couple as a going-away gift in 1937. D.G. Bell owned a gift shop in Morehead City where he exhibited and sold some of his work. Today, several of his paintings are held in collections at the Carteret County Historical Society. Following the discovery of his work, it was decided that a party would be held to unveil the “long lost” painting and showcase Bell’s talent.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p9-10, il, por
Record #:
34787
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following political upheaval, French Huguenot immigrants settled in New Bern, North Carolina in the late 17th century. Throughout the 18th century, this community thrived and welcomed new members to the diaspora. The author believes that several French pirates aboard Blackbeard’s captured French flagship settled in Beaufort. These populations, the author argues, influenced “Down East” linguistic patterns used today throughout Carteret County. The author provides a list of similarities between French grammar and Down East dialect.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p17-20, bibl
Record #:
34785
Author(s):
Abstract:
The annual Lukens homecoming is held to remember the small community of Lukens in Carteret County. First settled during the 18th century, town residents began leaving following extensive damage from the 1933 hurricane. Today, Lukens descendants and family members return once a year to share histories of the community. Descriptions of the town and residents are given by those present. A trip to Lukens follows the remembrances. Today, some of the Lukens structures are still standing in South River, North Carolina.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p7-8, il
Record #:
34783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carteret County author David Stick dedicated much of his career to studying shipwrecks and maritime heroes of the Outer Banks. Beginning as a World War II correspondent in the Pacific Theater, Stick returned to North Carolina and began studying the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Part of his research involved contacting wreck survivors and visiting the vessel, if possible. Towards the end of his life, Stick donated many materials to the Outer Banks History Center for continued use. He passed away in 2009.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p1-2, il, por
Record #:
34784
Abstract:
Bryan Salter worked for the Grit newspaper as a paperboy during his youth. Popular in southern states, the newspaper hired teens and pre-teens to deliver the paper to local residents once a week. Salter recalls various local teens employed by the paper; many of their customers were relatives or family friends. Eventually, the newspapers circulation declined and today it is no longer delivered to a subscriber base.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p2-3, il, por