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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for The North Carolina Booklet Vol. 9 Issue 4, April 1910
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Record #:
34553
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Abstract:
George Durant was a Virginia resident who, in 1659, joined a group of settlers traveling south to purchase land in near the Perquimans River in modern day North Carolina. The Durant family settled on a tract aptly named Durant’s Land and established a tobacco plantation. Rising taxes on New England tobacco imports created tension among planters and Durant threatened to revolt against the Governor in charge of the Albemarle region. Durant became one of the leaders in Culpepper’s Rebellion and was a key participant in re-establishing the colonial government.
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Record #:
34552
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1753, the Moravian Brethren purchased 100,000 acres of land in North Carolina for Church settlement. Members could buy a 2,000 acre lot in one of the land tracts and settle the area; the entire community became known as Wachovia. The contracts for each lot are preserved in German archives. A map of the tracts is included in the article with additional information on the owners through 1767.
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Record #:
34554
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Abstract:
This article draws on the written histories of the English explorers who visited Roanoke Island in 1584 and 1587 to investigate the fate of the lost colony. Hatorask, or Hatteras banks, was the home of Manteo and the Croatan which indicated to explorers that it was a potential destination for Roanoke residents. Local oral history suggests Hatteras residents are the descendants of the Croatan and English colonists.
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Record #:
34555
Author(s):
Abstract:
President Andrew Jackson was raised in South Carolina; however his birthplace may have been North Carolina. Jackson’s parents settled near the North Carolina/South Carolina border and Jackson himself claimed he was born south of the border. The author uses oral histories and land tract data to argue that the McKemey household where Jackson was born fell within the North Carolina boundary in Mecklenberg County.
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