NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for The Laurel of Asheville Vol. 13 Issue 8, August 2017
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
29903
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Cheyenne Trunnell, an Asheville painter of ethereal landscapes, art has meant a lifetime of self-discovery and spiritual awakening through communion with the natural world. With training in both art and psychology, Trunnell uses her art as a form of therapy.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dave and Sue Angel recently opened Elevated Mountain Distilling Company in Maggie Valley, Haywood County, North Carolina. They offer tours and samplings of the company’s vodka, whiskey and peach-flavored moonshine. Guests also learn about the production cycle of corn whiskey, and the culture and history of distilling in the area.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29906
Abstract:
Western North Carolina provides a wide range of choices in wedding planning. This guide highlights the region’s best wedding venues, accommodations, transportation, catering, fashion, decorations, gifts, and entertainment.
Source:
Record #:
29912
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League celebrates their fiftieth anniversary. Margaret Gilbert and Olive Granger started the league in 1967, recruiting mostly women artists in Black Mountain and the surrounding region. Members continue the legacy of its founders through regular meetings, displays of work and varied art classes.
Full Text:
Record #:
29911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Home Land is a new exhibit at the Asheville Art Museum honoring Native American art, culture and history. Most pieces were provided by collector Lambert Wilson and Eastern Band Cherokee artist Shan Goshorn. Goshorn also provided letters and narratives pertaining to the Trail of Tears and centuries-old medicine stories.
Full Text:
Record #:
29909
Author(s):
Abstract:
Haywood County, North Carolina boasts the highest average elevation for any county east of the Rocky Mountains, with thirteen peaks above six-thousand feet in elevation. Waynesville and Maggie Valley provide visitors with a range of events, shopping, dining, and sightseeing opportunities. This article highlights some of these attractions in a brief travel guide.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29905
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bare Dark Sky Observatory is a new Certified Star Park in Burnsville, North Carolina. This is the first such certification to be given in the southeastern United States, and one of only fifteen in the world. The observatory features the largest telescope in the region, and offers a pitch-dark atmosphere to ensure an optimum star-gazing opportunity.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29910
Author(s):
Abstract:
The activity of sanging or digging ginseng was also one of the most profitable pastimes for Western North Carolina families. The hardwood forests of the Appalachian Mountains were the ideal environment for this hardy perennial. Through most of the nineteenth century, ginseng was an important source of money for subsistence farmers, and tons of ginseng were shipped annually to Asia where it was highly valued for its medicinal properties.
Full Text:
Record #:
29904
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great American Solar Eclipse will be visible in North Carolina on the afternoon of August 21. Astronomers at the University of North Carolina at Asheville explain how the total solar eclipse occurs, and the history of astronomical theories. The best places to view the eclipse are in the western region of the state, and numerous towns are hosting viewing events.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29908
Author(s):
Abstract:
Western North Carolina is known for its biological diversity and plentiful wild mushrooms. The Asheville Mushroom Club invites the public to celebrate FungiFest on September 2, 2017, in Swannanoa, North Carolina. A full day of guided hikes, classes with experts, fresh displays from local foraging excursions and identification assistance will be offered by skilled club members.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Slow Food Asheville picked the Cherokee Purple heirloom tomato to spotlight for its 2017 Heritage Food Project. In 1990, Craig LeHoullier of Raleigh, North Carolina, obtained and grew a packet of unnamed seeds that had been shared by the Cherokee Indians more than one-hundred years before. The tomato is purple in color and has gained a widespread fame amongst heirloom tomatoes.
Full Text:
Record #:
29914
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference began thirteen years ago as a gathering of women who met to immerse themselves in the study of herbal medicine and the Wise Woman tradition of Earth-based healing. The annual event takes place in Black Mountain, North Carolina, and features classes in herbal medicines, holistic healing, women health and wellness.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29913
Author(s):
Abstract:
Electric cars have become more attractive to consumers as environmental stewardship has become increasingly relevant. In the Asheville metropolitan area, there are more than sixty public charging stations for electric cars, some of them solar-powered. The use of electric cars has been promoted as part of efforts to reduce air pollution.
Source:
Full Text: