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5 results for The Laurel of Asheville Vol. 13 Issue 4, April 2016
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Record #:
28536
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Asheville are playing a large role in shaping campus habits. The Student Environmental Center on campus has been advocating for sustainable living practices on campus and some of the initiatives include organizing a bicycle repair shop, implementing a compost program for residence halls, and gardening on campus. Other initiatives, awards the university has won, and the work of the students and the Office of Sustainability are detailed.
Record #:
28535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hiking the Appalachian Trail is a dream many people have, but few are prepared to do. The author describes her desire to hike the trail, the research which has been helpful for her preparation, and the advice experienced hikers have given her.
Record #:
36471
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fly fishing and typing have deep roots in the Western North Carolina, according to the author. Theories related to their origins include people such as the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and places such as southern Appalachia. Bell attributes fishing’s enduring appeal to the lure of its therapeutic effect. Modern efforts to lure more to fishing include the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail in Jackson County. Rivers recommended by the author for fly fishing are Asheville’s French Broad River and Transylvania County’s Davidson River.
Record #:
36468
Author(s):
Abstract:
Birdwatching, also called birding, is touted by the author as one of the fastest growing hobbies in the United States. Birdwatching skills discussed were binocular use, use of field guides, and times to engage in the hobby. Concerning the use of field guides, anatomical features to pay attention to includes shape of the bill, skull, and body; colors of feathers; and songs.
Record #:
36473
Author(s):
Abstract:
A perhaps lesser known architectural endeavor of Asheville’s Douglas Ellison is a home he blueprinted based on his vision of an Irish monastery. A source of inspiration for the home’s architectural design was The Book of Kells, which its original owner, Rose Brown, also drew from for the house’s interior. She decorated the walls with frescoes containing religious themes such as the four apostles. Proof of Brown’s frescoes and The Book of Kells’ enduring inspiration is the present owner, Rebecca Crosson. In addition to renovating the frescoes, Crosson is producing paintings inspired by the book believed written in the eighth century.