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9 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980
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Record #:
6567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lafayette House was built before 1790 on land adjoining Contentnea Creek in Lenoir County. At that time England ruled the land and the county was named Dobbs. After 1890, the house became a tenant house and then a vacant house. Gerald Tripp purchased the house for restoration in 1979. Harker describes the work on the house, which had never known plumbing, central heat, wiring, and the telephone before the Tripps installed them.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p52-53, il
Record #:
6565
Abstract:
It lies at the end of Caney Fork Road in Jackson County. It measures approximately 15 feet long and 10 feet wide. Every square inch of it is covered with petroglyphs; all are deeply etched and no two are alike. It is thought to be 5,000 years old. It's Judaculla Rock, one of North Carolina's most intriguing attractions. Clyne discusses the rock and some theories about its markings.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p20-21, il
Record #:
6566
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ray discusses the creation and history of the Uwharrie Mountains, which are the oldest mountains on the North American continent. Located in the Piedmont, the mountains' attractions include the Uwharrie National Forest, which covers 46,000 acres; Morrow Mountain State Park, Town Creek Indian Mound; and the Uwharrie Trail, a forty-five mile hiking route.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p44-45, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
35879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Countering the appeal of Jaws, the latest film beast offering chills, thrills, and spills, was Stanley’s story of the great white hog. It proved that these triple attraction factors were not necessary to generate a tantalizing tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
35893
Abstract:
It was an enlightened response to the energy crisis, educating about an eco-friendly fuel source. Cited were virtues of stoves and types of burners. Observed were good tree types. To remove danger from a daring alternative, provided were books like Using Coal and Wood Burning Stoves Safely and Barnacle Parp’s Chain Saw Guide. As for reasons not prosaic, highlighted were activities generating what he called the “aesthetic charm” of the fireside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p14-16
Record #:
35894
Author(s):
Abstract:
The handle in question wasn’t part of an old fashioned pump. Rather it, was the stress that modern individuals, particularly type A, are vulnerable to through daily hassles and frustrations. Included as enlightenment for the long term effects of daily stress were studies related to heart attacks and high blood pressure. For those seeking encouragement as well as enlightenment, suggested were stress management exercises such as meditation and muscle relaxation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p17-18, 54
Record #:
35895
Author(s):
Abstract:
How to get there was transportation of the two wheeled, self- propelled variety: bicycles. Encouraging people to forego four wheeled transport were directing them toward the virtues of scenic routes; route guides; route maps; and its ecological and fiscal frugality.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p22
Record #:
35896
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Crystal Coast included treasures not to be found in a chest or pirate ship. Included among the troves of visit worthy towns including the stretch between Beaufort and Cedar Island known as “the Original Downeast.” Proving its value of an historic sort entailed mention of Beaufort’s colonial roots and remembrance of Fort Macon as a Civil War battle site. As for personal historic merit, cited was Pine Knoll Shore’s connection to relatives of Theodore Roosevelt.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p27-33
Record #:
35897
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reports of Canadian Goose retreating the Great North Way for Deep South go back at least a few centuries. It began with John Lawson’s accounts written during the early 1700s. With his as a touchstone, publications persisted through the early twentieth century. More recent sightings have been confined to the Carolinas, with locally bred varieties the last of this bird species.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p68, 65