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9 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980
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Record #:
6541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blind from birth, Doc Watson rose from the obscurity of his Deep Gap community to international acclaim as a folk musician. He is acknowledged by many as the fastest guitar picker in the world. He has recorded sixteen albums and appeared on many others with other musicians. In this TAR HEEL interview Watson discusses disco music, politics, the uncertainties of the music business, and his impressions of a Concorde flight.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p17-18, il, por
Record #:
6540
Abstract:
Wilson native James Newcombe reminisces about his days in the lighthouse service. He served on lightships, which function the same way as lighthouses, except that they are anchored out at sea. Newcombe ended his career at the end of World War II at the Cape Lookout lighthouse.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6
Record #:
35812
Abstract:
Many articles are written about NC’s series of lighthouses, but keepers often not mentioned. In this instance, the spotlight was placed on the person who kept the beacon burning. Highlighted were details of lighthouse keeper life and later work experience aboard a lightship. Also mentioned were the seven lighthouses where he worked, such as Cape Charles on Smith Island and Cape Lookout off of Harkers Island.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6
Record #:
35815
Author(s):
Abstract:
Details betraying the size of the town and number of decades past were in Smith’s short story. There was the town population of six families; wood burning stove; brass bed; coal as a heat source. The most evident, though, was the date mentioned in the life of Viola and her family. Armistice was no ordinary day, but not just because it signaled the end of WWI. It also meant Uncle Milton’s return from France’s front.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p12-13
Record #:
35822
Author(s):
Abstract:
Vacation and recreation spots typically heavily populated—Atlantic Beach and the Appalachians. A place formerly popular was Hot Bed Springs. What made the originally named Warm Springs a hot bed for visitors was not entertainment venues, historic sites, or recreation areas. It was the reputed curative powers of its waters.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p49-50
Record #:
35819
Author(s):
Abstract:
To many, Rolesville could have been a “blink and you miss it” kind of small town. What made the town near Raleigh hard to pass by was being near the “Unique Grave.” What made the grave unique was its location: inside of a rock. What also made it unique: the story about the tomb created for a man not wanting his earthly remains in the earth.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p16
Record #:
35821
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stonework experienced a renaissance in counties like Orange and Macon. The comeback had come from masons Steve Magers, Lyn Walters, Suzanna Stewart, and Tom and Joe Kenlan. Their chimneys were featured as an illustration of stonemasonry at its most creative.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p44-45
Record #:
35818
Author(s):
Abstract:
The courtyard was part of what started as Brown’s Chapel, the elegy not alluding to the Thomas Gray’s Romantic poem. This elegy was remembrance of those in the graveyard for what became the schoolhouse. Stories shared by longtime residents with the author made evident the effort to keep the memories of ancestors and the church alive.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p15-16
Record #:
35820
Abstract:
The guide featured ten towns, spanning Coast to Mountains. Profiles highlighted what made each town unique. Sup worthy restaurants included Durham’s Bullock’s Barbeque, Greensboro’s the Hungry Fisherman, and The Blue Stove in Pinehurst—Southern Pines. Historical sites included the old Market House in Fayetteville, Wilmington’s Thalian Hall, Raleigh’s Oakwood section, and Bethabara in Winston-Salem. Entertainment hubs included the Charlotte Motor Speedway, High Point’s North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, and Asheville’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p19-21, 23-24, 26, 28-34, 36-41