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9 results for Tar Heel Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979
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Record #:
6532
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ruffin-Roulhac House, built in Hillsborough in the early 19th-century, now serves as the town hall. Mayor Fred Cates initiated the project to restore the structure in 1971. Professional architects advised against it because the building was unsound and almost overgrown with vegetation. However, local craftsmen restored the building in ten months. Dodd lists the individuals who owned the house over the years and describes some of its special features.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p24, il
Record #:
6531
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1921, off the coast of North Carolina, the schooner Carroll A. Deering fell victim to the treacherous waters of Diamond Shoals. Lifesavers from four stations responded, but heavy seas and strong wind prevented their boarding the ship for four days. When they did, rescuers found the crew had vanished without a trace. Only three ship's cats were found. The vessel was built at Bath, Maine, in 1919, and was 255 feet long. Total value was $275,000.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p18, 51, il
Record #:
6534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Galax is a little plant with a heart-shaped leaf that grows on mountain slopes in western North Carolina. “Goin' Galackin'” is a mountain term for a trip deep into the mountains to harvest the leaves. Each year millions of these leaves end up in funeral wreaths and Christmas decorations around the country. Five thousand leaves can bring in as much as $12 from a wholesaler. DeLaughter describes the plant, the people who pick them, and ”goin' galackin.'”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6533
Author(s):
Abstract:
Longstreet Church, founded in 1758 by the people of Longstreet Community, now sits on land owned by Fort Bragg in Fayetteville. The church was active continuously until 1895, and then sporadically until 1918, when the U.S. government purchased the land, with the provision that the church and its cemetery would be protected and preserved. The church is all that remains of the once-thriving Scottish community of Longstreet.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p37, il
Record #:
35770
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountains were a valuable part of NC, the author proclaimed, initially measuring this value in the types of precious stones to be found in ranges such as Pisgah. Discussed later was their greatest source of wealth—the people. Such people included those there before the arrival of English settlers, such as the Cherokee. Such people included the generations of immigrants and present day resident of Appalachia. The author concluded that collectively they helped to make the area what it became.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p27-28,45
Record #:
35773
Abstract:
The author asserted the home, with grounds declared a historic site by the Federal Government, belied significance on many levels. Personal significance was illustrated in the builder naming the house after a town in Ireland. Personal significance can be perceived in the appreciated beauty of Western North Carolina that encouraged the Sandburgs’ move from Michigan. As for its historical significance, that can be gauged in its construction during the antebellum period and the original owner’s position as treasurer for the Confederacy.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p54
Record #:
35771
Abstract:
The familiar conflict between North and South found a place in Southern Pines, which the author revealed was a Northern outpost established after the Civil War. The event spurring the conflict was the 1907 Blues and Grays Convention. This civil war’s outcome, peaceful, was fostered between Squire Charles Shaw and Captain Asaph Clarke, representing what the author called Johnny Reb and Billy Yank.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p29-30, 50
Record #:
35772
Abstract:
The former ECU English faculty member educated readers on the origins of pig picking, a dining tradition she declared was a socio-economic equalizer. As Faulkner disclosed, North Carolina can almost claim authorship of this tradition. Authorship can be claimed as far as the tradition starting in the South. The dividing line—the Mason-Dixon line, that is—can be found far north of it, with this Southern tradition having caught on in at least one town in Pennsylvania.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p47-48
Record #:
35769
Author(s):
Abstract:
The hobby the hobby hoped readers would fall into was birdwatching. Helping to make this pastime seem more enjoyable were tips such as optimal feeds and feeding stations. Contained also were birds to expect and types of seed they prefer. At the end of the article were a list of books with more information and insights about this entertaining and enlightening activity.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p22-23