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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Tar Heel Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978
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Record #:
6079
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina was the stronghold of downhome baseball during the period between the two world wars. The state had more than fifty minor league teams, more than any other state at that time. Williams recounts a time when the players had fun, the fans had a party every night, and the team owners made money, or at least didn't lose too much.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p10-12. 52, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
6247
Abstract:
After the Civil War, John T. Patrick, North Carolina State Commissioner for Immigration, was ordered to seek ways to bring settlers into the state to help bolster the nearly non-existent economy wrecked by the war. He chose to build a town in the Moore County Sandhills. Huttenhauser describes the project, which, because of the obstacles the location presented, was called at the time Patrick's Folly. The was named Southern Pines.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p30-35, 44, il
Record #:
6248
Abstract:
Apiculture, or beekeeping, attracts around 30,000 keepers in the state. However, only around a dozen or so keep bees on a large scale - over 300 hives. Only three states have more hives than North Carolina - California, Florida, and Texas. Waldorf discusses this fast-growing pastime in the state.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p39-41, il
Record #:
35643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl Roberson was the man with the Edgecombe experience. His experience had encouraged many to peg him a Renaissance man. This Renaissance man earned his title through a full life experience, one lived in Edgecombe and far beyond. It could be measured in his learning how to ski while in the army and restoring a local historical house, in a Master’s from Butler University, Indiana and an administrative position at Edgecombe Technical Institute.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p18-21, 45
Record #:
35644
Author(s):
Abstract:
The trinity of Bs referred to types of trout that made NC Mountains a popular fishing area. They are Brook, Brown (also known as Speckled), and Rainbow. What makes this sport possible also was the right attire and equipment, along with knowledge of the state’s laws and licenses.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p22-25
Record #:
35647
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of Stem’s notes on black music history: its African origins and intermingling with Christian hymns; noted musicians like the Jubilee singers and Scott Joplin; and types of melodies, such as roustabouts, work songs and spirituals.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p42-43
Subject(s):
Record #:
35642
Author(s):
Abstract:
The passage of years wasn’t enough to dim the recollection of a sixth grade teacher like Miss Elva and classmate like Jeffro Tillerson. Though they were gone in a sense by the time of Beauchamp’s writing, they were still alive in memory, and worthy of written recollection.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p14-16
Record #:
35646
Abstract:
The longleafs left could be found on the James Boyd estate in Southern Pines. Thanks to the preservation of this pine breed, Boyd may be known in NC history for more than his historic novels Drums and Marching On.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p34-35
Record #:
35645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The secret the author shared in the days after its discovery with three others was a Red Crocus. Though the flower was long since gone from the yard in which it grew, it proved to be much alive in another sense.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p26-29