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16 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2,
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Record #:
36630
Abstract:
A group of high school students from Brevard, NC are doing science research through Cooperative Extension and 4-H in a program called ‘TIME for Real Science. The students were studying kudzu bugs, an invasive insect pest that attacks soybeans and trying to learn how to control them with scents.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p33, 35, il
Record #:
36633
Abstract:
The authors talk about the fishermen and oystermen of Ocracoke and the dilemma they had in 2006 when the last fish house went up for sale. The watermen organized and formed OWWA (Ocracoke Working Watermen’s Association) and then by forming a nonprofit umbrella organization, ‘Ocracoke Foundation,’ they were able to pursue grants and help the community. They bought the last fish house and renovated it into the Ocracoke Seafood Company.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p42-44, il
Record #:
36631
Abstract:
The author talks about the life of Dr. Mary Frances Shuford, of Asheville, NC, and her struggle to get medical facilities for African Americans in Asheville. The author also gives the lives of Catherine Aitken Owens and Julia Greenlee Ray who also helped in the struggle.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p36-38, il
Record #:
36629
Abstract:
The author gives the beginnings of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service since 1914 showing farm families the new farm and homemaking skills and how to preserve food. This led to Corn Clubs for boys and Tomato Clubs for girls, which in turn became 4-H.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p32, 34, il
Record #:
36632
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Abstract:
The author gives the history of Dr. William Sharpe, a neurosurgeon from New York, who bought the Hammocks and Bear Island, near Swansboro, NC. To save it from development, he eventually turned it over to the NC Teachers Association in 1950 and it became Hammocks Beach State Park in 1961
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p39-41, il, por
Record #:
36628
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives a history of the Moses George family who came from Lebanon, Syria in 1916 who worked hard and eventually started a retail food distribution company now worth one billion dollars.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p29-31, il
Record #:
36618
Abstract:
The author tells of the Bennett College women who joined in the Woolworth Lunch counter sit-ins and continued to picket and march for equality. Dr. Esther Terry, who had taken part in the movement said “Bennett taught me that a meaningful education came with a responsibility, not only to recognize injustice, but to act against it.’
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Record #:
36625
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Abstract:
The author gives the lives of Horace Sowers Kephart and his photographer friend, George Mesa, who did much to preserve the natural beauty of the NC Mountains, which led to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The other Horace, is W. Horace Carter, a small town newspaper publisher in Tabor City, NC, who used his newspaper to push back against KKK violence.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p18-21, il
Record #:
36626
Abstract:
Through the HNNC (Healthy Native North Carolinians) Network, North Carolina Indian tribes are planting community gardens, constructing walking trails, renovating tribal grounds and hosting events to encourage healthy eating and physical activity.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p22-23, il
Record #:
36617
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Abstract:
The author invites the reader to find the people who made a difference in North Carolina by reading building and school names, highway markers, and articles on North Carolina.
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Record #:
36619
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Abstract:
The author gives the history of Dr. Pittman who did much for better medicine in North Carolina.
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Record #:
36627
Abstract:
The author gives the life of Selma Burke (1900-1995) trailblazing Black female sculptor.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p26-28, il, por
Record #:
36620
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Abstract:
The author gives a history of her grandfather, Rev. Grover Cleveland Hawley (1907-1990) who worked hard for equality in education for blacks in Creedmoor, Granville County, NC.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p10-12, il
Record #:
36623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stories about military artifacts from the collection of Col. Westray Battle Boyce (1901-1972) of the Women’s Army Corps in WWII, found in the collection of the NC Museum of History. Featured are WWII medals like the Service Medal with Bronze Star, Legion of Honor, Women’s Army Corps, and War Department General Staff medal.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p15, il, por
Record #:
36622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author tells the story of Manteo, the American Indian Chief, who met and helped the Englishmen in the Roanoke Voyages of 1584 and 1585. He would travel to England twice, returning to Roanoke Island in 1587 with John White and the group that would become known as the Lost Colony. She discusses the impact on the Indians by interaction with the Englishmen.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 53 Issue No. 2, , p13-14, il
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