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7 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 38 Issue 2, Spring 1999
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Record #:
4163
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Several members of the Pea Island Life-saving station, including the station keeper, were dismissed for negligence in 1879. When Richard Etheridge, an Afro-American, was placed in command, the remainder of the white crew quit, and Etheridge was free to choose a crew possessing the best qualities of a lifesaver. The crew was all Afro-American. Their service in saving lives earned them a reputation for skill and courage.
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Record #:
4162
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Lying off the coast of North Carolina is a stretch of ocean known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Many ships and sailors have met disaster there. Survivors could count only on people in coastal communities on the Outer Banks for help. It was not until 1870 that the federal government established the United States Life-Saving Service to aid ships in distress. The name was later changed to United States Coast Guard.
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Record #:
4167
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Twelve feet beneath the state government Administration Building in Raleigh is the N.C. Emergency Management office. This office responds statewide to two types of emergencies: man-made disasters, including chemical spills; and natural disasters, including snowstorms and hurricanes. The office locates and coordinates help from state and local agencies and focuses it on the emergency at hand.
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Record #:
4161
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One hundred years ago people had little forewarning when a natural disaster, such as a hurricane or tornado, was about to strike. For example, Outer Banks residents had little notice of the Old August Storm of 1899 that flooded Hatteras Island with three to ten feet of water. Today a vast array of technology, including satellites, television, radio, and computers, keep people appraised of dangerous weather threats.
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Record #:
4164
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Three devastating floods struck Western North Carolina in the years 1916, 1940, and 1971. The most severe was the flood of 1916. Forty-one continuous hours of rainfall on July 15 and 16 inundated the area. Damage included nine railroad bridges swept away on the Catawba River; 895 miles of track destroyed or put out of service; and homes, factories, and fields washed away.
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Record #:
4160
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Abstract:
Before Hurricane Fran, Hazel was one of the most powerful storms to strike the state. The beaches of Brunswick County were hardest hit. Huge waves driven by 150 mph winds swept away hundreds of buildings. At Long Beach only 5 of 357 buildings survived. In the ensuing years Hazel was the benchmark against which other storms were measured.
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Record #:
4165
Abstract:
Tornadoes are winds violently rotating in a dark column at speeds up to 300 mph. In 1889, a tornado killed fifty-five people near Rockingham. A powerful one hit Greensboro in 1936. Two tornadoes - the Forsyth County tornado of May 1989 and the Stoneville tornado of March 1998 - are profiled.
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