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8 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996
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Record #:
3148
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Protestant religion had a strong influence in antebellum society, with most people being either Baptist or Methodist. Not only was the church a place of worship, it was also a social gathering place, community disciplinarian, and education promoter.
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Record #:
3146
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quakers felt the need to free their slaves but were prohibited by a 1741 law that stated only the state could grant freedom. To get around this, Quakers deeded slaves to the Yearly Meeting, which by 1814 had around 800. They were later moved out of state.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p16-18, il, por
Record #:
3173
Author(s):
Abstract:
Disagreement over legislative seat apportionment, the prohibition of persons of various religious faiths from holding office, and other factors led to a call in 1835 for a convention to revise the 1776 state constitution.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p10-13, il, por
Record #:
3172
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the antebellum period, writers in the state were read around the country. Popular topics were poetry, native Americans, slavery, and plantation life. George Higby Throop's BERTIE is an example of the plantation novel.
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Record #:
3171
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prior to 1830, the state was called the Rip van Winkle state for not keeping pace with dynamic changes happening elsewhere. However, between 1830 and 1861, the antebellum period, positive changes in transportation, education, and politics took place.
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Record #:
3149
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1848, Dorothea Dix lobbied the General Assembly for a hospital for the mentally ill. Though rejected at first, Dix's relationship with the dying wife of legislator James C. Dobbin earned his strong support, and the bill passed.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3147
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three distinct classes made up antebellum white society: the upper class, or plantation owners who grew cash crops; yeoman farmers, who owned land and grew crops for subsistence and bartering; and poor whites who rented land.
Source:
Record #:
3174
Author(s):
Abstract:
Afro-Americans during the antebellum period consisted of two groups: slaves, who were considered property; and free Blacks, whose rights, such as voting, were limited by the Constitution of 1835.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p14-15, il, por