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6 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995
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Record #:
2587
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the end of the Civil War, over 331,000 slaves had been freed statewide. Although they were free, life for former slaves was not easy. Opportunities were limited, and in the years following emancipation, progress was slow.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p12-17, il, por
Record #:
2590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many ordinary people led civil rights protests. In 1968-69, when school desegregation in Hyde County threatened the loss of two Afro-American schools, a one-year student boycott saved the schools.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p32-35, il
Record #:
2593
Abstract:
Begun in 1785 with 167 skilled and unskilled slaves, Somerset Place in Washington County was a prosperous plantation by 1790. Slaves' descendants continued the work until the end of the Civil War in 1865.
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Record #:
2589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within the Hayti district in Durham in the late 1800s and early 1900s, Afro-Americans built strong economic and social institutions, although they were still rigidly segregated elsewhere.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p27-31, il, por
Record #:
2680
Author(s):
Abstract:
Slavery in the state's mountains differed from that supported by the cash-crop economy of the east. In the west, slave owners were mostly professional men who used the slaves in their businesses or hired them out to others.
Source: