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4 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984
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Record #:
6201
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Abstract:
Electric streetcars brought cities many advantages. They were the fastest form of city transportation for their time. They promoted the growth of suburbs, and they made the central business districts thriving markets for goods and jobs. In 1891, Charlotte businessman E. D. Latta, having observed the cars' use in other cities, determined to bring them to the city. Morrill recounts how Latta's idea developed.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
6200
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Abstract:
How did the early settlers get their water? Main sources were wells, rainwater cisterns, river, and springs, but water from a faucet was unheard of. In the Moravian settlement at Salem, however, a waterworks was installed in 1778. Ratcliff describes how this system, which began with the use of bored oak and heart-of-pine logs, was created.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p2-4, il, bibl
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Record #:
6206
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Abstract:
Before the 1920s, most of the roads in North Carolina were dirt, and in wet weather, impassable. Enter Harriet Berry, graduate of the State Normal and Industrial College in Greensboro and staff member of the North Carolina State Geological and Economic Survey in 1901 and of the North Carolina Good Roads Association in 1902. She and state geologist Joseph Pratt worked relentlessly for two decades to bring the state good roads. While Pratt went off to war, Berry brought a road bill to the legislature. It was a bitter fight with much opposition, but Berry prevailed. State-funded roads became a reality.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p15-17, il, por, bibl
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Record #:
6210
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Civilian Conservation Corps, popularly known as CCC, was one of the most remarkable youth programs ever established. It was created during the Great Depression by President Franklin Roosevelt to put young men to work reclaiming the nation's natural resources. Over 60,000 North Carolinians worked in the program, which lasted from 1933 to 1942. Jolley describes what working in the CCC entailed.
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