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8 results for Sea Chest Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981
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Record #:
29935
Abstract:
In the early days, sailing vessels were used to transport goods from the mainland to the villages on the Outer Banks. Using two-masted vessels, crew would sail to Elizabeth City for food, supplies, building materials, and coal.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p22-23, por
Record #:
29934
Abstract:
George O'Neal, Jr. is working to save a collection of 21 ship models made by his father, George O'Neal, Sr. The collection, which includes models of historic and modern sailing vessels from barkentines to schooners, provide examines of vessels that sailed the North Carolina coast.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p18-21, por
Record #:
29933
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once used for fishing and as a main mode of transportation on the Outer Banks, the spritsail skiff could hold up to two to three hundred pounds of fish in one run. Although once prominent, the spritsail skiffs have gone out of style with the introduction of powered boats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p8-11, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29932
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last spritsail skiff on the Outer Banks was built in 1931 by Bill Quidley and sold to Vetter Willams for $35.00. The boat was used for fishing and transportation before it was sold to Loran O'Neal who modified the boat as a pleasure craft.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p6-7, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29955
Abstract:
The National Park Service is trying to buy time for the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse until a decision is made about what to do concerning erosion. A temporary measure has been to install sheet pile to resist water, but an alternative involves moving the lighthouse approximately 2400 feet back from the shoreline.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, pSP1-SP4, por
Record #:
29956
Author(s):
Abstract:
For easy-to-handle and stable boats for oystering, North Carolinians 1880s chose the sharpie. From the 1880s to the 1930s, sharpies provided oystermen with high decks and rounded sterns to maneuver in the reefs and sounds.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p31, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29954
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the advantage of shallow draft and sea worthiness of a deep hulled boat, the North Carolina shad boat is of simple construction and provides a practical design for fishing.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p30, por
Record #:
36017
Abstract:
She was designed as a Bicentennial project, bearing a brand of authenticity in its fifteen stars and stripes flag. However, this sailing vessel still may have been a point of pride, since clipper ships had played an important role in America the past two centuries, notably during the war of 1812.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, p35-38