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9 results for Sea Chest Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973
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Record #:
7546
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST interviewed people who had lived in Dare County all their lives to see what they remembered about some of the severe storms that struck the area. O'Neal interviewed Mrs. Ruth Austin of Hatteras. Mrs. Austin, aged sixty-two, describes storms she remembers, starting in 1933.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p18-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7547
Abstract:
Staff members of SEA CHEST interview Hatteras native Harmon Willis about his twenty-year search for the Monitor. The Civil War Ironclad Monitor sank in a storm off Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862. Willis discusses his trips to suspected sites for the Monitor and other individuals who searched for the lost ironclad.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p24-28, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7545
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Dillon, Dare County commissioner, discusses the county's problems with ocean erosion and why he feels the National Park Service could do more to alleviate the problem.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p5-17, il
Record #:
7548
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the entries started in the Spring/Summer issue. This issue's compilation covers 1875 to 1879.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p49-60, il
Record #:
35932
Abstract:
If asked to identify visionaries for flight, one might consider the Wright Brothers. Someone else with maven status for advocating airplanes, but perhaps not so well known was General Billy Mitchell. Largely unpopular during his time, Mitchell’s assertion of combining aircraft and naval operations gradually gained support through the efforts of the then Secretary of the Navy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p44-45
Record #:
35931
Author(s):
Abstract:
An aspect making a people unique are expressions and descriptions that reveal their perception. This collection represented nautical lifeways that defined cardinal cultural values of the area and served as a memory for values of generations past. Phrases perhaps unique to the Banks included atter-a-while and foine; ones more characteristic of time period included Hessian and sparkin’.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p41-43
Record #:
35933
Abstract:
General Billy Mitchell’s efforts to establish airplanes in naval operations included building an airstrip at Cape Hatteras. The first mission, taking place during the summer of 1923, was proving sinking battleships possible. Ironically, for many people living in the area, it was regarded as much entertainment as witnessing an historic event.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p46-47
Record #:
35935
Author(s):
Abstract:
WWII reached Hatteras Island courtesy of spies, as accompanied photos of the houses they stayed in attested. Among spy reports famous enough for film was of a man many Islanders may have never assumed could be among the enemy. Hans Hoff, the spy whose electrocution was filmed, had lived with one of the local families one summer in the early 1930s.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p64-69
Record #:
35934
Author(s):
Abstract:
A continuation of the series begun in Sea Chest’s first edition, this collection of journal entries mostly chronicled the meteorological conditions between September 1874-July 1879. Wedged between daily reports of barometric pressure were occasional ones of ships setting sail and their minor damages. Rare reports were of loss of life from shipwrecks and drownings.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Fall 1973, p48-60