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12 results for Sea Chest Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980
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Record #:
29923
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along the North Carolina and Virginia coasts, hundreds of shipwrecks lie on the beaches and underwater. Although some will never be uncovered, others are popular tourist and dive destinations like the DIAMOND SHOALS LIGHTSHIP and the USS MONITOR.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
29928
Abstract:
The United Methodist Church at Kinnakeet began with a dream and bushels of oysters. Villagers found the area around Cape Channel in the Pamlico Sound to be abundant with oysters. After years of selling and saving, resources were pooled and lumber was bought to build a church. The church was rebuilt in 1962 after a hurricane swept through the coast .
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p37-39, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29931
Author(s):
Abstract:
For about twelve years, the Pirate's Jamboree was held at Cape Hatteras Lighthouse each year in the spring. Hosting the 'World's Largest Fish Fry' brought in thousands of people, as they watched dory and beach buggy races. Unfortunately, by 1965 businesses stopped supporting the jamboree due to the messes left behind by tourists.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p60-61, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29929
Author(s):
Abstract:
Considered one of the best spots for surfing on the east coast, Cape Hatteras is known for its ocean swells and strong storms. The closeness of the continental shelf and shipwrecks build up bars that create the perfect place for large crashing waves.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p44-47, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loran O'Neal, Jr. has been gill-netting since he was fifteen years old. Today he drops the nets off the bow of a 19 foot boat and moves in and out of shallow waters depending on the season. With that, he catches trout, croakers, and crab.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p24-27, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29927
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Nags Head, North Carolina, the Outer Banks windmill was reconstructed by Lyanne Westcott using the help of and English millwright. The windmill, a new landmark, harkens back to the mills used on the Outer Banks in the 1700-1800s to grind grain.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p32-36, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29930
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Green Island Clubhouse, located south of Hatteras Island, was a haven for fishing and hunting activities. But in 1933, a hurricane hit the Island, washing away the kitchens, knocking down the ceilings and chimneys, and emptying the cisterns.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p48-51, il, por
Record #:
29925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formed in 1957, the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club originally had 16 members. Now over 350 people receive monthly information and participate in invitational tournaments every spring.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p20-23, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beach fishing on Hatteras Island has been a long tradition. Early in the morning, men shove off the beach with motor-powered dorys and use bunt nets to pocket up fish.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p17-19, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
36016
Abstract:
It was a lost art to America in general, perhaps. In Hatteras Island, Mrs. Brittie Burrus proved interest in quilting could be found in girls who were part of the Methodist Church’s Day Circle.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p62-63
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map
Record #:
36015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59