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18 results for Our State Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017
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Record #:
34964
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During World War II, there became a shortage of pilots in the United States. The Women’s Auxiliary Service Pilots (WASP) program was organized in 1942, allowing women to train to be pilots in support positions in North Carolina. Though they never saw combat, they helped in anti-aircraft training exercises that still proved dangerous, resulting in thirty-eight deaths.
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34966
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Jones von Drehle Vineyards and Winery was established in 2008, and quickly became a fixture in the North Carolina wine community. The Jones family and von Drehle families, co-owners, sell to over 300 wine stores and restaurants, often making the deliveries themselves.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p50-52, il, por Periodical Website
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34965
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Bia’s Gourmet Hardware is a restaurant in Asheboro, North Carolina known for their unique flavors and laid-back atmosphere. Owner Bia Rich, originally from Brazil, has brought in flavors from all over the world and meshed them seamlessly with locally sourced produce.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p42-46, il, por Periodical Website
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34970
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At Heirloom, a restaurant in Charlotte, Cherokee farming knowledge has become pivotal for their success. Chef Clark Barlowe incorporates varieties of the Three Sisters (corn, beans, and squash or pumpkin) into his menu and locally sources all ingredients. In this way, Cherokee cooking techniques are being integrated into modern North Carolina cuisine.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p80-86, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34968
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North Carolina author Wiley Cash’s “The Last Ballad” focuses on the fallout of the 1929 Loray Mill strike in Gaston County. Set behind the historical and political backdrop of this time, Cash tells a story of motherhood and friendship and how it helped shape the labor industry of the South.
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34969
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Joyce Locklear, a member of the Coharie tribe of North Carolina, has acted as a cultural and educational liaison for the Coharie communities for almost 40 years. During her tenure, she taught classes of tribal crafting, visited congressman, and held dance competitions as ways to get tribal youth interested in their heritage.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p74-77, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34973
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Chang and Eng Bunker, world-renowned conjoined Siamese twins, settled in Mount Airy, North Carolina in the mid-1800s. After decades traveling the world in circus exhibitions, they desired a quiet life and to settle down with their wives. Now, their descendants come back to Mount Airy to remember the twins and their legacy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p132-136, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34974
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Fred Fletcher, owner of the Jolly Knave in 1960’s Raleigh, has started hosting reunions for the shag dancing community. Though the doors of the Jolly Knave closed in 1971 and the Atlantic Beach Jolly Knave was sold in 1978, hundreds of North Carolinians still remember them as the best dancing clubs in the state, and travel hundreds of miles for the annual reunions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p138-142, il, por Periodical Website
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34972
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Portsmouth Island sits on the southern tip of the Outer Banks in North Carolina. Once a booming fishing and shipping town, it now sits abandoned except by tourists. Every two years, descendants of the island’s residents hold a reunion to celebrate the influence of Portsmouth in their lives.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34971
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The state of North Carolina recognizes eight Native American tribes: the Cherokee, Lumbee, Sappony, Haliwa-Saponi, Coharie, Waccamaw Siouan, Meherrin, and Occaneechi. This photo essay focuses on these tribes, their culture, and their traditions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p90-109, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34967
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Sunset Beach, along the southern tip of North Carolina’s coast, is a popular tourist destination. The Sunset Inn, owned by Dave Nelson, opened in 2000, offering guest rooms and a quiet getaway for tourists. And if these guests want to find a permanent home on the island, Nelson can assist with that as a real estate agent.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p55-56, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34976
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After the Fontana Dam was built in the 1944, seventeen miles of the Fontana Valley area was flooded. Family cemeteries that were above the flood waters have since been restored by the National Park Service under the direction of former resident Helen Cable Vance. Every Sunday between April and October, a group of people go to one of the twenty-seven family cemeteries for its Decoration Day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p154-160, il, por Periodical Website
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34979
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After serving in the military and struggling to adjust to civilian life, John Mahshie started a 10-acre farm in Henderson County, North Carolina. The Veterans Healing Farm is harvested by other veterans who volunteer their time and donate every Tuesday’s crop to the Charles George VA Medical Center in Asheville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p182-190, il, por Periodical Website
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34975
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After a career in the NFL as center for the St. Louis Rams, Jason Brown decided to settle back down in Louisburg, North Carolina and set up his farm. Since 2012, he has produced thousands of pounds of sweet potatoes and donated them to the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina for food pantries and after-school programs.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p144-152, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34978
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The Turnage Farmhouse in Fountain, North Carolina was once a home, store, and post office for the neighboring houses. Through time though, the property became rundown until one family member, Earl Trevathan, decided to buy his mother’s childhood home and restore it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p172-180, il, por Periodical Website
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