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12 results for Our State Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018
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Record #:
34863
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R. Wayne Bailey was instrumental in bringing the wild turkey population of North Carolina back from the brink. In 1970, there were only 2,000 wild turkeys in the state; now, there are over 265,000. Author T. Edward Nickens pays homage to Bailey while detailing his own experiences with wild turkeys.
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34862
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In the small town of Sylva, North Carolina, a town-staple known as Lulu’s on Main has been in service for several years. Under new management since 2013, owner Mick McCardle has introduced sustainability plans and customer service initiatives, while his son Devin has incorporated more international flavors into the dishes served.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p48-50, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34861
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Cindy Hamrick decided to move to North Carolina’s Triangle area to start a farm of her own. After initial success, she decided to move to the next big step of a dairy farm, with their main produce being yogurt. Carolina Farmhouse Dairy is now the only yogurt dairy farm in North Carolina and has experienced wild success within the first two years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p28-30, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34864
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The Great Flood of 1940 in North Carolina was caused by days of torrential downpours from a hurricane. Landslides caused by the rain and clear-cutting mountainsides engulfed several towns, killing twelve people and ruining hundreds of properties. This article remembers those that died and the impact the landslides had on the towns they crushed.
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34884
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Blue Ridge Women in Agriculture has paired up with the Watauga County Public Library to create a seed library. Community members send in seeds so that community members can borrow up to 10 seed packets per season with a promise that they will return the new generation of seeds at next harvest. This has become a trend throughout North Carolina, with success at bringing back certain species back to the forefront of agriculture.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p110-114, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34887
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Reynolda House in Winston-Salem, North Carolina has had sprawling gardens since it’s construction. But only after Mary Reynolds Babcock took over the estate after her parents’ death did they became even more extensive. She even created rooms in the house specifically for gardening and flower arranging. Her flower care notes are now on display at the Reynolda House.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p132-140, il, por Periodical Website
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34886
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North Carolina has been a good state for growing wheat in for centuries. But now, there is a renaissance occurring for heirloom grains. Small businesses including bakers, wheat farmers, and millers have begun to work together in order to bring back traditional grains into bread recipes of the south.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34881
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North Carolina’s coast is home to diverse and unique ecosystems, plants, and animals. The NC Coastal Federation was created in order to protect this area, as well as provide sustainability and restoration projects.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p74-93, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34883
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After several family emergencies, Sara Edi Boyd of Winston-Salem began to press flowers to find a way to connect family members to their loved ones. People from all over the country request that she press flowers of significance so that they can survive the test of time.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p100-108, il, por Periodical Website
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34885
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Author Michael Parker describes the first time her ever bought a map which eventually led to his collection of various maps. His most treasured map, however, is the Nature Lover’s Map of North Carolina, with hand-drawn natural depictions covering the entire North Carolina landscape.
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34882
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Author Drew Perry narrates why he and his wife take their sons out into the wildlands of North Carolina. Detailing their first ocean trip and their trips to the mountains and fields throughout the state, he hopes to instill a sense of pride and protection of the land.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p96-98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34888
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Every year since 2006, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources hosts a week-long volunteer event in order to keep track of the number of hellbenders in rivers. Hellbenders are large aquatic salamanders that have recently seen falling populations, yet are good indicators for clean water and strong populations of other aquatic species.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p146-156, il, por Periodical Website
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