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12 results for Our State Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017
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Record #:
27528
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Abstract:
The Hardaway Site is one of North Carolina’s greatest archaeological repositories. Located in the Uwharrie Mountains, the site has yielded a plethora of arrowheads, including Palmer, Kirk, and Stanly points. These artifacts help indicate how Native Americans lived in the region 12,000 years ago.
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Record #:
27524
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Abstract:
The Safe Bus, at one point the largest black-owned transportation company in the world, was a big part of the community it served and remains a point of pride in Winston-Salem 44 years after it closed. Many people say that segregation gave birth to Safe Bus and integration ended it.
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Record #:
27527
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Opened in 1929, The Dunhill Hotel is one of the few historic boutique hotels operating in Charlotte, North Carolina, and is old enough to have a friendly ghost named Dust. The hotel also features paintings by North Carolina artist Philip Moose and displays local art from Sozo Gallery.
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Record #:
27526
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The North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro is one of the largest zoos and natural habitat parks in the world. The zoo opened in 1974 to enrich the community’s lives with animals, plants, and science. Its most recent addition is a ten-year-old polar bear named Nikita.
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Record #:
27525
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Mustafa Somar relocated from Istanbul to open Sherefe, a Mediterranean restaurant in historic downtown Fayetteville. Sherefe is named after the Turkish word for cheers, and known for its quality meats and soups. But much of its success has come from hospitality and personable atmosphere.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p42-45, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27530
Abstract:
The flea market at the Hickory American Legion Fairgrounds in Newton, North Carolina offers an international variety of produce and street food. The diversity is largely due to the region’s roots in manufacturing, and immigrant groups, such as the Hmong and Mayans, who brought their farming traditions with them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p102-108, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27532
Abstract:
On Ocracoke Island, where old-timers claim kin from Blackbeard’s day, a new community is taking shape. Most of the newcomers are from Hidalgo, Mexico, and many are from the same extended family. The two cultures may not speak the same native language, but they understand that the best way to weather change is together.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p116-120, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27529
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hardaway Site is one of North Carolina’s greatest archaeological repositories. Located in the Uwharrie Mountains, the site has yielded a plethora of arrowheads, including Palmer, Kirk, and Stanly points. These artifacts provide insight into Native American hunting practices 12,000 years ago.
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Record #:
27531
Author(s):
Abstract:
From pita bread to pickles to politics, generations of Lebanese-American families have carried their culture, food, and traditions to North Carolina. While food and agriculture businesses are common in the stories of many Lebanese immigrants, others have been committed to building a strong community through job creation and downtown Raleigh revitalization.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p110-115, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of recent immigration trends, approximately forty percent of people receiving American citizenship were not born in North Carolina. Moreover, in nearly one-fifth of the state’s counties, naturalized citizens comprise a majority of the population. As for other ways naturalized citizens have affected the state, the author examines tangible and intangible factors. The tangible includes food and tradition; the intangible includes a sense of hope and determination.
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Record #:
36991
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Abstract:
The word keepsake may bring up images of items fragile and collectible: not for everyday use. In Castle’s case, the heirloom that has lasted the test of time weighs six pounds. The pictured heirloom, which has inspired a collection of kitchen tools, has a value beyond measure.
Record #:
36992
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the February event spotlighted, it was called a “snow moon,” for the November event highlighted it was called a “supermoon.” Pictures taken of the moon in places like Asheville’s Pack Square and DuPont State Recreational Forest proved that, whether the moon was seen in the city or out in the county, it offered a spectacular view of lunar phenomena.