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12 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015
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Record #:
22604
Abstract:
The collard sandwich is made of fried cornbread patties, homemade chow chow, and a scoop of cooked collard greens. This unique sandwich is just beginning to gain popularity outside of Robeson County, North Carolina where it was traditionally prepared as a Lumbee Indian dish.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p136-138, 140, 142, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22601
Abstract:
In North Carolina, restaurants are making cultural flavors more accessible through a common food: the sandwich. In Charlotte, Durham, Carrboro, and Greensboro markets and sandwich shops are bringing French, Bosnian, Cuban, Middle Eastern, and Vietnamese flare to a classic dish.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p110-114, 116, 118, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22602
Abstract:
Most North Carolina restaurants have their own version of a soft-shell crab sandwich, but the Sanitary Fish Market and Restaurant in Morehead City, North Carolina is known to locals for its take on the unique dish.
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Record #:
22600
Author(s):
Abstract:
The American Meltdown foodtruck has earned its reputation as one of Durham's top foodtrucks, and the chef, Paul Inserra, has brought back several awards for his locally sourced sandwich creations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p104-106, 108, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22603
Abstract:
A uniquely North Carolina food is known as livermush. Made of pork liver, head parts, and cornmeal, livermush from Mack's Liver Mush and Meat Co. or Jenkins Foods is a staple in western North Carolina's economic and cultural history.
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Record #:
22599
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snappy Lunch, opened in 1923, sites in Mount Airy, North Carolina and boasts the state's most famous pork chop sandwich. And with the help of the Andy Griffith Show, Snappy Lunch became a tourist destination.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p96-98, 100, 102, il Periodical Website
Record #:
37617
Abstract:
Many residents of a community known today as Junaluska are descendants of those who made life vibrant in this historically black neighborhood. The referenced Affrilachian life, now recognized in neighborhoods such as Junaluska, long proved challenging to document because of factors that rendered blacks and whites from the region invisible.
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Record #:
37613
Abstract:
Works of art produced by the Quilt Trail Project are partly utilitarian; within these decorative squares are stories of people from a region. Six Western North Carolina counties host over two hundred quilt blocks whose stories reflect the history of towns as well as individuals. Examples include a block of an open door, which hangs in a Burnsville bank. The bank’s significance lie in being the only one to stay open in that area during the Great Depression.
Record #:
37612
Author(s):
Abstract:
The celebrated wild ponies of the Outer Banks are descendants of the Mustangs left behind by early explorers and colonists. More recently, they run wild in places like Shackleford Banks and are resilient from a diet of sea oats and marsh grass. Their centuries old appeal led to the Colonial Spanish Mustang becoming the official state horse in 2010.
Record #:
37621
Author(s):
Abstract:
A neighborhood in the metro cited as a New South city has a newer reputation. Originally building a sound economic base from its arts community, Charlotte’s NoDa survived the Recession and closings of multiple art galleries. Today, its positive reputation draws out of towners in and residential real estate represents a bright economic future.
Record #:
37623
Abstract:
Old mills and factories in towns such as Roxboro, Rocky Mount, Edenton, Greensboro, Winston-Salem have been offered new lives. Buildings constructed to enhance the state’s tobacco and textile industries now houses buildings such as a public school, arts and sciences center, nature conservancy, biotechnical plant, condominiums, and medical office complex.
Record #:
37637
Author(s):
Abstract:
An approach General Sherman became famous for—high risks actions yielding great victories—worked on the battlefield and off. On the battlefield illustrations took him and his combined forces, the Army of the Tennessee and Georgia, through Goldsboro, Fayetteville, and Wilmington before reaching South Carolina’s capital by February 1865. It was in Columbia the battle Sherman believed hastened the end of the war took place, one that, like his march through Atlanta, culminated in a great fire.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p151-152, 154, 156, 158, 160 Periodical Website