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15 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014
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Record #:
22222
Abstract:
In 1965 the NC General Assembly passed a piece of legislation. It selected a sea shell symbolic of the state. To those who were casual observers of the doings of the legislature, it would seem a simple activity. Actually it was not an easy task. The legislation was introduced by Moncie Daniels, and he favored the Scotch Bonnet. However, there were competing shells and considerable controversy. Other legislators had their favorites--ear snail shell, false cerith shell, prickly winkle shell, and the hairy shell. Finally after many hours of debate, the Scotch Bonnet prevailed.
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22225
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David Grubbs and Derek Glass started Mindful Supply Co. in Greensboro almost three years ago. What is unique about the company is that everything is done in the US, particularly in North and South Carolina, from growing the cotton, ginning it, spinning it, knitting it, cutting it, and finally cutting and sewing it into a T-shirt. At that point Grubbs and Glass design the artwork and choose the color. From there it goes to Burlington for dyeing and printing. Shirts can be made for an individual or a group.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p30-31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22223
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The Cone brothers built four textile mills in Guilford County around the turn of the 20th century--White Oak Cotton Mill, Proximity Cotton Mill, Revolution Cotton Mill, and Proximity Print Works. Cooke interviews Lillie Mae Crum, now 91, about her experiences working in the White Oak plant for 45 years from 1941 to 1986.
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22224
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Chapel Hill artist Elaine O'Neil specializes in a particular art form--textiles. From a distance her work appears to be a painting, but on closer inspection the viewer discovers that it's a textile collage--a work made up of many pieces of cotton, wool, velvet, and silk.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22227
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Elizabeth \"Libba\" Cotton grew up in Carrboro around the turn of the 20th Century. She bought a guitar with money she made cooking, cleaning, carrying water, and chopping wood. She learned to play the guitar, but held it upside-down, playing it lefty. She wrote songs about the life she experienced. Those songs would later be performed by the likes of Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead. It was a chance encounter in the late 1940s with folk specialist Ruth Crawford Seeger that brought her talent before the world. Her appearances included Carnegie Hall and the Newport Folk Festival. Cotton died in 1987 at age 92.
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Record #:
22235
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Michael Markham has a unique approach to dispensing barbecue in the Research Triangle Area. He tows a red barn, 18'x6,' behind his pickup truck. Inside are a smoker and all the fixings for a barbecue plate with collards and baked beans or a barbecue sandwich. Raleigh tends to discourage food trucks; there are a lot of hoops to jump through. It took Mike months to get the barn up to code, but he did it and now he has been selling his product for almost three years. Mike can be found parked outside office buildings, festivals, and places where there are other food trucks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p47--48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22226
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Tasha and William Kornegay of Apex never thought making cotton candy was the career path they were on. She works in mental health, and he is in marking; they met fifteen years ago while working in a school system. In 2013, Tasha was trying to raise funds for HIV research. She rented a cotton candy machine and took it to the Peak City Pig Fest. It was a hit. The Kornegays are vegan and their product is certified organic, kosher, gluten-free, with no artificial food coloring.
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Record #:
22234
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During World War I Charlotte was the site of Camp Greene, a large military training camp. Recruits from all across the nation were sent there for training in preparation for possible overseas service. At its peak more than 60,000 soldiers lived on base.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p40-42, 44-45, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22253
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Four Stokes County residents recall their lives and experiences--Johannah Stern, who owns Singletree Gun & Plough, a six room bed and breakfast mountain home; Andrew Jones, who owns Jessup's Mill; Kyle Hoover, who is a fishing guide on the Dan River; and Jan Priddy Charleville, owner of Priddy's General Store.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p146-150, 152, 154, 156, 158, 160, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22254
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In his ongoing series on North Carolina and the Civil War, Gerard describes how the dead were remembered prior to the outbreak of hostilities and how the deaths of Southern soldiers changed the way those at home mourned for them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p162-164, 166, 168, 170, 172, 174, 176, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22251
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It's a different looking, small ribbed green pod that is edible. It's has a slimy-when-cooked-texture and might be the vegetable from another planet. But it has wound its way onto the palette of Southern eaters who devour it fried, raw, or in Brunswick stews and gumbos. It's okra!
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p114-118, 120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22247
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Kelly describes a Southern delicacy popular in North Carolina and across the South -- boiled peanuts, pronounced boil' peanuts. They are an acquired taste for some, but they cross the food cultures from arugula eaters to chitlin' lovers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22246
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Pepsi Cola is a North Carolina classic. Concocted by druggist Caleb Bradham in 1893 in New Bern, the soft drink has become one of America's enduring symbols. Mims recounts its history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p80-84, 86, 88, 90 Periodical Website
Record #:
22252
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Buy it in stores or concoct it yourself, pimento cheese is the South's hallmark sandwich. Huler recounts some of its history and how to have it alone or in combination with other foods.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22248
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Redeye gravy is another Southern delicacy. Shestak describes what it is, how it is prepared, and how a diner eats it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p100-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, il Periodical Website
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