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8 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014
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Record #:
22141
Abstract:
A grand estate known as the Whalehead Club stands along Currituck Sound in the shadow of Corolla Lighthouse. The article describes the history of this notable home from its inception to its current use. Built by railroad tycoon, Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his second wife Marie-Louise Josephine LeBel, who was wealthy in her own right, it reportedly cost $383,000, about $4.3 million in today's money. The house was completed in 1925. The extravagant home, located in a remote area, has ties with local fishing and fowl hunting industries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p80-86, 88, 90-91, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22138
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Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. At that time the state was not involved. It was left to the counties, and the counties did not work together. Therefore, crossing county lines would often provide a different type of road for drivers. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Governors Locke Craig and Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-49, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22139
Abstract:
Sylvester Hursey began his barbecue in Burlington back in the mid-40s in his backyard. Son Charles, now near 70, began working at the establishment when he graduated from high school in 1960. Wallace recounts how Hursey's, from its humble start, has grown to three locations in the Burlington area and received the first license in North Carolina to sell barbecue wholesale.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p53-54, 56-57, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
22140
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At one time state laws limited the manufacture and sale of craft beer; however, all that has changed over the past thirty years. Now there are over one hundred craft breweries around the state. Dove takes readers on a pictorial tour of some of them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p58-77, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22145
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Gerard recounts moonshining in North Carolina's past and present. While illegal distilling still goes on, the state now has thirteen legally approved distilleries. Gerard talks with two distillers--Troy Ball, who owns the distillery Troy & Sons in Asheville, and Scott Maitland, whose TOPO Distillery operates in Chapel Hill.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p110-116, 118-119, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22144
Abstract:
Quoting from the writings of two men connected closely with the city--Thomas Wolfe, a native, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, a visitor, Kruse captures the feel of Asheville during a period of American excess--the 1920s--followed by the crash of the 1930s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p92-96, 98, 100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22164
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During the fighting at Petersburg, the Union Army hatched a plan used in medieval siege warfare. Using Pennsylvania miners, engineers dug a tunnel under the nearest Confederate installation, Elliott's Salient--a battery of four 12-pounders manned by 20 gunners and supported by 300 infantrymen. The tunnel was packed with four tons of black powder. On July 30, 1864 the mine exploded, wiping out the Salient and opening a path for the Union attack. Gerard describes what happened when Union regiments charged into the Crater instead of around it and how the Confederate army responded.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p144-146, 148, 150-152, 154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22162
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E. Pat Hall, a Charlotte real estate developer, opened Carowinds in 1973; however, the fuel crisis of the period and dwindling funds forced him to sell to Ohio-based Family Leisure Centers in 1975. When the park reopened in 1976, its big draw was Thunder Road, a roller coaster standing ninety feet high. Its unique feature was two tracks with cars running side-by-side, then splitting apart and coming back together near the finish. The coaster's tracks covered 4,000 feet.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p120-122, 124, 126-127, il Periodical Website
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