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11 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015
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Record #:
23909
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Abstract:
North Carolina is full of sacred places,those places that make us feel connected to nature and the world around us. The author highlights some of his favorite spots in the Piedmont region while also describing others from the mountains to the sea.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p94-96,98-100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
23908
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Abstract:
Along the state roads of North Carolina over 1,500 historical markers commemorate important people, places and events in the state's history. The author investigates the origins of the N.C. Highway Historical Marker Program, the Program's procedures, and the stories behind some of the state's markers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p37-38, 40,42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23910
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Belmont Abbey College in Gaston County opened its doors in 1876. Founded on Benedictine tenets and staffed by Benedictine monks, the college continues to grow and prosper in modern society.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p102-104, 106-108, 110, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23913
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Wing Haven Gardens and Bird Sanctuary in Charlotte's Myers Park neighborhood is a three-acre place of solitude for those hoping to briefly escape their busy metropolitan lives. The home and gardens belonged to Edwin and Elizabeth Clarkson from the 1930s through 1970.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p156-158, 160, 162, 164, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23912
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Abstract:
John Lawson explored the Carolinas in 1700, during which time he wrote a detailed description of his journey from Charleston, through what is now the Charlotte and Hillsborough areas, and finally ending in little Washington. Canoer and writer, Scott Huler, aspires to retrace Lawson's journey and see how the Carolinas have changed since Lawson's time.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p142-144, 146, 148, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23911
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Abstract:
Westglow Resort & Spa in Blowing Rock attracts visitors looking for relaxation and solitude. Housed in the historic twentieth century home of the writer and painter, Elliott Daingerfield, the resort and spa provides a variety of activities for its visitors.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p112-114, 116, 118, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23914
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Abstract:
This article, the third in a series on North Carolina in the Civil War, traces Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston's efforts to stop Sherman's march at the Battle of Bentonville in March of 1865.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p185-186, 188, 190-192, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
37640
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UNC-Chapel Hill’s main library for over five decades is still the main space on campus for the author. Cited by Kelly as containing the largest collection of about a single state in the United States, the facility also lives up to its larger than life reputation in features such as a wood- paneled room containing literary rarities. The wood-paneled room, the Reading Room, adds to the feeling of contentment through its chandeliers, marble floors, and arched windows.
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Record #:
37638
Author(s):
Abstract:
The land Timberlake Farm Earth Sanctuary rests upon currently cannot be used for development, courtesy of a conservation easement in place since 2001. In continuing to set aside the land, visitors can still experience the sacred in its hiking trails, cabins, on-site chapel, and man-made lakes. As for Timberlake’s present owner, Carolyn Toben, the site has had this effect, providing comfort and consolation during a forty year span defined by professional gain and personal loss.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p120-122, 124, 126 Periodical Website
Record #:
37639
Author(s):
Abstract:
A project begun in Japan in the aftermath of WWII has become an international endeavor, with 180,000 peace poles erected in 180 countries. As for the profiled pole, Peace Pole Number 1 in Rowan County, it came to represent the international pursuit of war’s cessation on a small scale. The English equivalent of “May Peace Prevail on Earth” on the pole in Salisbury’s City Park dedicated in 2007 is also inscribed in Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p128-130, 132-133 Periodical Website
Record #:
37641
Author(s):
Abstract:
The perceived peaceful presence loomed large in St. Jude of Hope, Little Chapel of God’s Love, and an unnamed chapel that seats four. The authored trusted in finding the divine in Trust, Gibsonville, and near Trinity. Chapels the author noted were sometimes sought, other times found, were named after the patron saint of lost causes; erected from wood part of a Lutheran church built in 1745; and once a smokehouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 10, March 2015, p166-168, 170-172, 174 Periodical Website