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20 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013
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Record #:
20984
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Jack Cobb began selling barbecue out of his car in Farmville in Pitt County because he knew that in the 1940s, a black-owned business would have a hard time becoming successful. So, he and his son Rudy filled his car with barbecue plates and drove all over town selling them for 65 cents. In 1971, Cobb and his son built a cinder-block storefront in Farmville, but because of racial turmoil during the 1960s, it did not have a dining room. Still, people came to buy. Jack Cobb died in 1989, and Rudy, now 72, continues his father's traditional pit-cooked barbecue over charcoal, oak, and pecan wood.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p61-62, 64, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20983
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In 1876, Alexander Freeman, a freed slave, bought property at Federal Point Township, a peninsula separating the Cape Fear River from the Atlantic Ocean, that included 300 acres of beachfront land. His grandchildren inherited the land in 1902, and began developing it as a resort, called Seabreeze, for African Americans during the Jim Crow Era. White traces the beach's history from its beginning to the start of its demise by Hurricane Hazel in 1954 until Hurricane Fran claimed the last of the property in 1996.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p52-53, 56-57, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20980
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William Shepperd Ashe became president of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad in 1854. Shepperd's personal opinions about the Civil War and his efforts to connect the Confederacy throughout North Carolina are outlined in this article. Gerard frames the history of disorganized rail lines throughout the Confederate states by looking at the railroads of North Carolina during the Civil War era.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p188-198, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
20981
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Columbus, county seat of Polk County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p42-44, 46-48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20985
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During the Great Depression, the federal government purchased unused farmland in the Piedmont region. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named this land the Uwharrie National Forest. It occupies parts of Montgomery, Randolph, and Davidson counties, and it is one of the nation's smallest national forest. It contains a mountain range older than the Rockies or Appalachians and lakes. Perry describes the forest and the people who live in and around it.
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Record #:
20990
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How do U.S. Army Special Forces hone their skills in preparation for possible future dangerous missions? They go to Pineland, a fictional country made up of 15 counties in central North Carolina. Here they carry out \"battles,\" with the assistance of local residents who fill the roles of guerilla fighters.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p88-90, 92, 94, 96-98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20992
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Jennifer Watlington, a retired postal employee, couldn't find any greeting cards for veterans in her hometown of Reidsville. So she did the next best thing--she made her own, and a graphic artist friend illustrates them. She's currently working on a plan to sell them online.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p136-138, 140, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20991
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Bathanti, who is North Carolina's poet laureate and a professor at Appalachian State University, discusses how he teaches combat veterans to write about their experiences and what he has learned about combat. The state has one of the largest populations of veterans in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p104-106, 108-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20993
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Rowe describes dinners held across the state to honor veterans of various service branches who are members of an exclusive club--they all are recipients of the Purple Heart.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p143-146, 148, 150, 152, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21003
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What happens to K9s after their time of military service is completed? Those who make it back often return, like their soldier counterparts, with PSTD, while others return with no problems. If the dog is fortunate, his handler, the person who knows him best, will adopt him. Otherwise, the animal is put up for adoption. Mims recounts the story of Doc, who was an IED sniffing dog who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and is now living in retirement.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p164-166, 168, 170, 172-176, 178, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21002
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Letters From Home is a tribute show to the Andrews Sisters, a 1930s and 40s singing group, popular among soldiers during World War II. Erinn Diaz, Serah Haley, and Chelsea de la Cuadra perform the songs, originally done by LaVerne, Maxene and Patty Andrews, in venues across the country--theatres, air shows, parades, VA hospital, and VFW conventions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p154-156, 158, 160, 162, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21004
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Most of Durham's best-loved bakeries are located within an area known as the Durham Bakery District. This area is helping to revitalize the city's downtown. Among the bakeries described are DaiseyCakes, Loaf Bakery, Monuts Donuts, Ninth Street Bakery, and Scratch Bakery.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p201-204, 206-207, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21005
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Purvis explores the possibility that Uncle Scott's root beer could become North Carolina's next great beverage. Root beer is part of an old tradition of making drinks from natural things. Purvis explains how Suzanne and Scott Ramsey hit upon the idea.
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Record #:
21820
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Once a month a pawnshop, the Main Street Music & Loan, morphs into a radio station in North Wilkesboro, broadcasting from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. in front of a live audience. The program is a throwback to the old radio days when bluegrass and country music bands played and the DJ did everything else. The show has been carried on WKBC--AM since 1999.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p24, 26-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21826
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Tom Kearney started a part-time job at WPTF in Raleigh in 1982 and in 1988 he had his own show, broadcasting weekly between 9 and 10 pm. His is a measured and soothing voice among a host of vitriolic broadcasters. He has a loyal audience, and his shows cover a range of topics like drive-in-restaurants and old movies, as well as guests including a pharmacist, economist, stamp-and-coin expert, and state government officials.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p28, 30, por Periodical Website
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