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14 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013
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Record #:
20800
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Opened in 1953, Dorton Arena in Raleigh is one of North Carolina's most ambitious and historically significant pieces of architecture. When construction was completed in 1952, it won First Honor Award of the American Institute of Architects and the Gold Medal in Engineering of the Architectural League of New York. In 1972, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and in 2002 it was dedicated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The designer was Matthew Nowicki, who was killed in a 1950 plane crash before construction began. It was the first permanent building in the world to support its roof by suspended steel cables.
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20801
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Paul \"Speedy\" Lohr opened Speedy's Barbecue as a drive-in in Lexington in 1963. Roy and Boyd Dunn worked at Speedy's since the beginning. Roy and a cousin bought the place from Lohr in the early 1970s. Boyd later bought out the cousin, and the two brothers have run it since 1978 as a restaurant--not a drive-in, though there is still a window where customers can order from outside. Speedy's is well-known for its large servings of Lexington style barbecue.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p61-62, 64, il Periodical Website
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20798
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Shortly after graduating from high school in 1958, Andy Thompson went to work with the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated in Charlotte, painting signs for them. In the late 1980s Thompson retired when the company stopped painting works on brick. He has kept busy, though, with new contracts and restoring signs that are fading away. These are called ghost signs. In 2011, the Coca-Cola decided to help fund the restoration of these signs, and Thompson is back with Coke where he began fifty-five years ago.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p19-20, 22, f Periodical Website
Record #:
20803
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Turner samples the fare of these mountain chefs at the following restaurants--Vidalia and The Gamekeeper (Boone); 1861 Farmhouse (Valle Crucis); and Bistro Roca (Blowing Rock).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p120-128, 130-131, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20799
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Morrisville, located in Wake County, is featured in Our State magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p38-40, 42-46, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20804
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Because of its culinary and medicinal potential, ramps, a much-maligned plant with a strong scent, is getting an image makeover.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p144-146, 148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20807
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The Banner Elk Winery, which opened in 2006, has, at 4,800 feet, the highest vineyard in the Eastern United States. The winery is co-owned by Richard Wolfe, Angelo Accetturo and Pete and Michelle Gerukos. Wolfe, who directs the Applied Science and Research Program at Appalachian State University, received a grant to start a vineyard at 4,800 feet. At first people laughed, but there are now thirty-two vineyards growing cold-hardy grapes in Avery and Watauga counties which the winery uses. The winery has been awarded a number of medals in competitions, such as the 2013 International Eastern Wine Competition in Sonoma County, California.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p168-170, 172, 174, il Periodical Website
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20805
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Lovers of good food, or foodies, delight in a journey through Asheville's dining scene and learn why the mountain city has a national reputation for its distinctive take on cuisine. The tour begins at the Battery Park Book Exchange and Champagne Bar, and for the next two and a half hours, participants take a leisurely stroll to sample small-plate offerings from six of the fifteen participating restaurants.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p150-154, 156, 158, 160, il, por Periodical Website
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20806
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Sroka describes one of Asheville's unique activities, the Asheville Drum Circle, a collection of several dozen drummers who appear Fridays nights to perform in unison at Pritchard Park. No one leads; there are no verbal cues; the beat just moves and changes on its own. The activity has been going on for over ten years and attracts all kinds of viewers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p162, 164, il Periodical Website
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20818
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Perry recounts how two deep sea divers and underwater welders, Tim Ferris and Bob Weihe, started The Blue Ridge Distilling Company, located twenty miles south of Morganton, and are revolutionizing the way whisky is made.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p176-180, 182, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20819
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Shaffer describes seasonal beers produced by three mountain brewing companies--Catawba Valley Brewing Company (Morganton), Highland Brewing Company (Asheville) and Pisgah Brewing Company (Black Mountain).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p184-186, 188-190, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20962
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Joseph Mumford Foy owned a 2,025 acre estate on the island of Poplar Grove, 15 miles northeast of Wilmington. After the death of her husband, Mary Ann Foy was left to manage the estate, which remained untouched throughout the duration of the Civil War. The article includes a detailed description of the estate, the Foys' progressive opinions concerning Southern secession and slavery, and the state's legislation concerning slaves and ownership.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p209-217, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20961
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The article looks at the Overmountain Vineyard near Tryon owned and operated by Frank and Lita Lilly. The couple grows and harvests five grape varieties on twelve acres, but the prize grape is a rare specimen from the Jurancon region of southwest France called petit manseng. Within the interview, the owners discuss their regular operations and the success of their white wines.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 5, Oct 2013, p192-198, por Periodical Website
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