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15 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014
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Record #:
21659
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Turner describes one of Greensboro's popular brunch places--the Iron Hen Cafe. Owner Lee Comer had a three-word mantra when she opened for business--fresh, local, good--with 80 percent of the food locally produced.
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21666
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Brooks did not come from Seagrove, nor did she grow up in a pottery family. She did not begin working with clay until she was thirty-two. Now, twenty years later, she's known as the \"Rooster Queen\" for her creations of stoneware roosters and chickens. Her specialty is Polish chickens that have wild, sea-urchin crests.
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21667
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Mims and son Silas take a father-son trip to explore the Outer Banks beach town of Duck. The town has a year-round population of just under 400, but in the summer time it swells to over 20,000. Among the things to see and do there are the Blue Point Restaurant, Duck Donuts, Gray's Department Store, and the Sanderling Resort.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p32, 34, 36-37, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21660
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Janet Kenworthy founded The Rooster's Wife, a nonprofit organization, in Aberdeen in 2006. Its purpose is to bring live music to the town. On show days she and her husband Jack provide musicians with a home-cooked meal. Performers run the gamut from Grammy winners to locals just beginning their careers.
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21668
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Kelly recounts the early days of telephoning in North Carolina when a person picked up the phone and the operator said, \"Number please.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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21669
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Joe and Peggy Swicegood have operated Little Pigs BBQ in Asheville for over fifty years. It began as part of the Little Pigs BBQ of America franchises, but by 1967, the chain was bankrupt. However, Joe and Peggy just kept right on going with their restaurant. Generally barbecue was too hard to do in a fast-food restaurant. McDonald's had tried but soon switched to hamburgers. Joe and Peggy had have a successful run, for as Joe says, \"If the food is good, the slaw is tasty, the place is clean, and the people are treated right, they'll come back.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p51-52, 54, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21671
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The Bodie Island Lighthouse has stood on the Outer Banks for 141 years. In all that time it had only been open to the public for a few days in 1988 during the U.S. Lighthouse Service bicentennial celebration. The black-and-white striped-tower later underwent a $5 million restoration, and in October 2013, 300 descendants of the 34 keepers gathered there to share their stories of growing up at the lighthouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p74-82, 84, 86, 88, 90, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21670
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Huler describes the new state-of-the-art Hunt Library at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. \"Robot\" librarians are among one of its most interesting features. A patron selects a title from a computer; a robot glides down a 160-foot-long, 50-feet tall, steel alley, finds the drawer holding the requested title, and retrieves it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p56-62, 64, 66, 68, 70, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21672
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The Troutman family, originating in Iredell County, has passed through eleven generations in and out the county borders. Their first reunion took place in 1904 in celebration of Henry Troutman's birthday and his daughter's visit from California. Since then the family has gathered 109 times. Tomlinson describes what a Troutman reunion is like.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p92-94, 96, 98-100, 102, , il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21679
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Philip Gerard, author and chairman of the creative writing department at UNC-Wilmington, moved to the city in 1989. He describes what it's like living among movie stars and movie-making on a daily basis.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p130-132, 134, 136-138, 140, 142-144, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21680
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VanWinkle describes some of the old vintage theaters around the state, like the Gem in Kannapolis and the Turnage in Little Washington.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p154-158, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21678
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Mims highlights moments in the life of North Carolina's most famous movie actress, Ava Gardner.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p116-120, 122, 124-126, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21691
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Gerard recounts how North Carolinians living in the western mountains waged their own civil war against each other between 1861 and 1865 and in some cases even later. They would feud over land boundaries, politics, and personal insults--often with deadly results. The Blalocks and the Pritchards had been feuding for over 150 years; yet in April 1861 William Blalock married Malinda Pritchard. They were not Confederate supporters. Gerard describes their exploits fighting against the Home Guards, conscription guards, and Confederate soldiers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p190-192, 194-198, 200, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21692
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Southerners love their fried chicken, and it's almost heresy to consider putting a sauce on it or eating it with a knife and fork.However, their savory delight is now being served at some restaurants with honey and other sweet stuff on it and it is sitting atop a waffle! Enter the new menu item--fried chicken and waffles. Lucas describes this new delicacy and some of the restaurants in the Triangle that serve it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p219-222, 224-225, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
37897
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North Carolina has become well known as a site for filmmaking. Houses where scenes have been filmed include a historic house in Rodanthe, a house in Southport, Bellamy Hall in Wilmington, and Biltmore Estate in Asheville. Outdoor settings made famous through movies are Lake Lure, Dupont State Forest, and Chimney Rock. Noted examples of facilities serving as movie backdrops are Charlotte Motor Speedway and Durham Athletic Park.
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