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10 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012
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Record #:
17995
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The Brady C. Jefcoat Museum of Americana is located in Murfreesboro. Jefcoat, now 96, has collected over 13,000 items which are housed in a former three-story school building. The items include an 1890 music box, pencil sharpeners, a courtship couch used on the set of Gone With the Wind, shaving mugs, and butter churns from the 1910s. When he was looking for a repository the Smithsonian made an offer, but he selected the Murfreesboro Historical Association because they agreed to display the whole collection.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p19-20, 22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17997
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Columbia, located in Tyrrell County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. It is the lone town in the county and for many years had one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, and one main road. Things to see there include the Scuppernong Millhouse Bakery and Café, the Brickhouse Inn, Vineyards on the Scuppernong, and the Pocosin Arts Folk School.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17996
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Founded in 1922, the University of North Carolina Press at age 90 is the oldest university press in the South and the country's fourth oldest. It has published almost 5,000 titles and has won all possible awards an academic press can, including the Pulitzer Prize.
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Record #:
18008
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The Miss North Carolina Pageant began in 1937 and this year celebrates its 75th anniversary. The pageant began as a swimsuit contest but has since evolved into a scholarship contest. Maria Beale Fletcher is the only North Carolinian to win the Miss America Pageant. Hughes recounts highlights from the seventy-five years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p67-70, 72, 74, 76-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
18012
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In 1995 the NC General Assembly passed a bill designating the sweet potato as the state vegetable. It was done not because the legislators admired its versatility or its tastiness, but because of the persistence of a Wilson fourth grade teacher and her students. Shaffer recounts how Celia Batchelor and her fourth grade class at Wilson's Elvie Street School began a campaign in 1993 to make the sweet potato the state vegetable. It was not without opposition from newspapers and the Legislature, but persistence won out.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p140-142, 144, 146, 148, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
18011
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In 1772 a number of Moravians moved from Pennsylvania to the North Carolina Piedmont. The settlers kept detailed records. When Winston-Salem decided to preserve Salem as it was in the 18th century, they turned to these records. Graff recounts information about the town and how it exists in the 21st century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p102-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38279
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Brady C. Jefcoat’s Museum of Americana has items representing American culture from the distant and more recent past. Opened in 1997, it contains the half of Jefcoat’s collection that was not auctioned off and is especially known for its 264 vintage record players and the country's largest collection of butter churns and irons. Despite the Smithsonian being receptive to his request to donate his immense collection, he chose Murfreesboro because the town was willing to display the entirety of his 13,000 treasures.
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Record #:
38280
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It was touted as the first book mill in the South, a pioneer in producing white paper from chestnut wood, and among the industry’s mavens in its attention to quality and production cost. Such factors have made Canton’s Champion Paper Company an economic staple for three generations. Its enduring importance to the community is on display in a photographs collection at Canton Area Historical Museum. It can be viewed in the history of the company provided by the author, which includes how many residents it employed at its height and how the founder’s business savvy helped to make the company a success.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p31-32, 34-35 Periodical Website
Record #:
38281
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The county seat of Tyrrell County is also the only town in the county, which was founded in 1793. It’s also defined as one is its identity as a singular town—one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, one road. How it’s defined as two: Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds forming the second largest estuary in the country; two animals, the red wolf and red cockaded woodpecker, being protected species.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65 Periodical Website
Record #:
38283
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Old Salem, settled in 1772 by Moravians, has had its history well preserved due to members compiling detailed daily life accounts. Because of this, the task taken on in the 1950s to preserve Salem and turn it into to Old Salem was possible. Currently, Old Salem reflects historical integrity in its 107 historic buildings and individuals who realistically reenact daily life, evident in the accompanied photographs. An example of a conscientiously preserved historic building is the tavern George Washington lodged in during his visit in 1791, looking much as it did during his visit.
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