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14 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012
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Record #:
17589
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Abstract:
Waynesville, county seat of Haywood County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the places not to miss seeing there are Main Street, the Sweet Onion, Frogs Leap Public House, Waynesville Historic Farmers Market, the Yellow House Bed and Breakfast, and elk viewing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p40-42, 44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17630
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Sharon Twiddy didn't plan to move to the Outer Banks or to restore old buildings and own real estate. However, thirty-five years ago her husband, Doug, convinced her that the coast was a great place to live. Among the places they have restored are the U.S. Life Saving Station, the Lewark-Gray House, and the Corolla School.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p32, 34, 36, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17628
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In the 1960s, Robert Hart, a Hickory physician and preservationist, purchased 200 acres outside the city limits. There he collected ninety-two buildings from Catawba and surrounding counties and created a place that imitates village life. With the help of his wife, he decorates the buildings with furniture from the time period in which they were built.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p20, 22, 24, 26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17629
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Those buried at St. Philips Church in Old Salem are remembered with a 12-foot hunk of red granite on which are listed the 131 names or parts of names of those buried there. The cemetery had been forgotten until the 1990s when it was discovered by archeologists who excavated and identified the graves.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p28, 30-30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17646
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Since the law raising the percentage of alcohol in beer passed in 2005, forty-one breweries have opened in the state. Turner describes how Sean Wilson, owner of the Fullsteam Brewery in Durham, Stacy Wilson, farm manager of Echoview Farm in Weaverville, who seeks to learn which hops will grow more productively in the state, and Roger Kimbrough, who owns the Bestway Grocery, a landmark in Greensboro since 1947 and who markets the beer, interconnect.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p78-82, 84, 86, 88, 89, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17759
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E. B. Harris is invaluable when it comes to the sale of agricultural products in northeastern North Carolina. When it comes to the auctioning of cows, farm equipment, or corn in Warren County, no one knows it or does it better.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p120-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, 136, 138, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17761
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Greene County is only 170,200 acres, and fifty-four percent of that land, or 92,000 acres, is farmland. Farmers in Greene County grown a variety of commodities from sweet potatoes, grains, and peaches to prawns.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p154-158, 160-162, 164-166, 168, 170, 172, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17760
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North Carolina has a varied foundation of soils to provide a varied foundation for agricultural practices in the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p140-142, 144-152, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17762
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A native reed to North Carolina, river cane is both utilitarian and decorative.
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Record #:
18098
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Recruiting slaves to serve in segregated regiments was a Union tactic to bolster ranks throughout the war. This article looks at a specific case in North Carolina centered on Abraham Galloway, an outspoken African-American man and escaped slave. Galloway became a respected leader both during the war as a ferocious fighter and afterwards as an elected politician.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p60-62, 64, 67, 69-71, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38277
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Considered a fixture at Raleigh’s Capitol Square is a local whose identity became synonymous with the birds who followed him, ones considered more of a novelty than irritant. Jesse Broyles’ peanut vending, as much as his companionship with these pigeons, merited his obituary in News and Observer and enduring reputation in this part of the state capital.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p210, 212, 214 Periodical Website
Record #:
38276
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What makes a farm work, according to the author, is the relationship between farmers and tractors. Another relationship discussed by Hughes reflects the tractor’s enduring importance in North Carolina. An illustration for this relationship is the anecdote about a farmer, his tractor, and child he trusted to operate it. Illustrations of the tractor’s importance in North Carolina is many counties having multiple tractor dealerships, her comparison between tractor and car dealerships, and assertion tractor dealerships are often community centers and places of business.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p174-176, 178-184, 186-188, 190, 192 Periodical Website
Record #:
38275
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As the author discovered, the explanation for the light was based on belief, not fact. There was no Joe Baldwin decapitated during a train accident in 1867, but a Charles Baldwin who died from injuries sustained during a train accident in 1857. However, there is still truth within the legend. It is represented in a visit inspiring President Grover Cleveland to share with a national audience his experience with the light. It is also represented in a street named Joe Baldwin Drive.
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Record #:
38278
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Abstract:
Cleveland Regional Medical Center’s path isn’t laid out like its ancient Greek counterpart. Cleveland Regional’s garden, labyrinth style, is not designed to make visitors get lost. However, it often yields being lost in thought, as well as the intended perception of being healed.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p228-230, 232, 234 Periodical Website