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30 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012
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Record #:
17272
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George Washington Creef, Jr. opened the Pioneer Theatre in 1918 in a Manteo schoolhouse. When his son took over in 1934, he built a stand-alone theatre a few blocks away. The Pioneer is now run by a fourth generation. All tickets cost $5, and drinks and popcorn sell for $1.50. Only family-style movies are shown and nothing R-rated.
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17271
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Paul Hee, recognized as one of the country's finest maritime artists, died in Newport, N.C., September 26, 2011. He retired after a life at sea and took up painting, studying at the Fort Lauderdale School of Art. Hee moved to Beaufort and established a studio on Marsh Street in the mid-1990s.
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17273
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Ayden, located in Pitt County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the things to see are the Ayden Collard Festival, held each fall; two barbecue establishments--the Skylight Inn and Bum's; the Ayden Flower Shop; Cindirene Southern Emporium, which serves good food; and the Gallery on Third.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p36-38, 40, 42, 44, il Periodical Website
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17285
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Started eighteen years ago by the late Bill McLawhorn and his wife Peggy, B's Barbecue is now run by their daughters. The place has no telephones and no take-out menus. B's operates on a frantic pace with servers passing out barbecue and chicken dinners to hungry customers until the place closes around 2 PM or when the barbecue runs out. Customers can either eat inside or outside at red-painted picnic tables.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p84-86, 88, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17286
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Red Bridges learned the barbecuing business from Warner Stamey in the 1930s, and in 1946 opened his own restaurant in Shelby. When he died in the mid-1960s, his wife Lyttle, known as Mama B, ran the business until her death in 2011. Her daughter, Debbie Bridges-Webb, granddaughter, Natalie Ramsey, and great-grandson, Chase Webb, continue the family business.
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Record #:
17283
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Gertrude Carraway led the campaign to reconstruct Tryon Palace. Carraway, who was a preservationist, historian, journalist, and a force to be reckoned with, gave fifty years of continuous service to the state through the N.C. Historical Commission. She died in New Bern, May 7, 1993, at age 96.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p48-50, 52, 54, 56, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
17284
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Garner describes the method by which Keith Allen of Allen & Son Barbecue prepares his barbecue. Hickory is the best wood to cook pork to perfection; however, it is becoming scarce, and Allen has to search for it, bring it to the restaurant, split it by hand, and reduce it to hot coals for the cooking.
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17300
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Richard Berrier learned about barbecue in Lexington and opened his first restaurant in Winston-Salem in 1991. What he serves is Lexington-style that is cooked over wood to get the smoky flavor. The restaurant is considered one of the state's best. In 1999 Berrier received a \"Certificate of Barbecue Excellence\" from the North Carolina Barbecue Club.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p100-102, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17301
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The Pit is housed in a 1930s former meat-packing plant in downtown Raleigh. It was started by Greg Hatem, who has a reputation for preserving historic buildings, as well as a passion for preserving the state's traditional foodways. The Pit roasts the whole hog--\"Everything but the squeal!\" Garner describes what make The Pit different from the usual barbecue restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p104-106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17299
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Garner explains why Lexington Barbecue is perhaps the best-known barbecue restaurant in the state and beyond. Wayne Monk opened his restaurant in 1962, and today he, his son Rick, and many relatives help to operate it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p94-96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17303
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Walter B. \"Pete\" Jones, who died in 2005, opened his barbecue restaurant, The Skylight Inn, in Ayden in 1947. Forty years later he had a silver-painted, wooden dome, just like the U.S. Capitol, built atop the building so people could find him. The restaurant has its own style--no tablecloths, no cutesy pig cutouts, no waitresses, just go to the counter, order, go to a table, sit down and eat the whole hog, eastern-style barbecue off the paper plates. Today, it is run by his son, his grandson, and nephew.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p112-114, 116, , il Periodical Website
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17304
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Warner Stamey opened his barbecue place, Stamey's Old-Fashioned Barbecue, in Greensboro in 1953. Jess Swicegood and Sid Weaver taught him how to prepare barbecue and over the years he has taught the secrets of the craft to other restaurant operators. Stamey's serves slow-roasted, chopped-pork shoulders and tangy-sweet vinegar-and-tomato sauce. The pit building where the barbecue is cooked is the largest and best equipped in the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p118-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17302
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Short Sugar's still occupies the same location where the Overby brothers opened it in 1949. Garner relates how the restaurant got its name and how the barbecue is prepared and served.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p108-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17321
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Once the American chestnut spread from the East Coast to the Mississippi River. The trees grew one hundred feet or more. They grew straight for the first fifty feet and produced great timber. The nuts were a cash crop that western North Carolinians sold at Christmastime. However, in 1904 scientists discovered the blight in New York City that by 1950 had destroyed about four billion chestnut trees. It is considered the largest ecological disaster of the 20th century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p154-156, 158, 160, 162-163, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17320
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In 1962 Wilber Shirley bought the former Hill's Barbecue in Goldsboro and opened it under his own name. He has prepared barbecue the traditional way for the past fifty years--cooking whole hogs entirely over hardwood coals. Wilber's is one of the few places left that prepare barbecue this way, and in the eastern part of the state, Wilber's is one of the biggest names.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p122-124, 126, il, por Periodical Website
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